A Healthy Start to College

Taking the right nutritional supplement for you is an important element in living a Cooperized lifestyle.

By: Karen Perkins, Account Executive, Cooper Concepts Inc.

As your child prepares to leave the nest and head off to college, there is no doubt that they are preparing for a season in their life unlike any other. The flexible schedule, opportunities to learn and try new things, thriving campus life, and close proximity to peers creates the perfect platform on which countless memories will be made. With so many exciting elements of this transition on you and your student’s mind, we want to remind you to help set your child up for a healthy semester.

It can be hard for college students to stay healthy. Crowded dorms and classrooms, along with reduced sleep and added stress often leave their immune systems trying to play catch-up. Dr. Cooper recommends eight healthy steps that make up a well-rounded, healthy life. One of the healthy steps to Get Cooperized is taking vitamins and supplements. So while your child may have outgrown taking a chewable Flintstone vitamin with their Fruit Loops® in the morning, it might not be a bad idea to continue to ask, “Have you taken your vitamins today?”

Cooper Complete® Health Body Pack
We recommend the Cooper Complete® Health Body Pack. Each canister contains 30 individually wrapped cellophane packets with a Basic One Iron-Free one-tablet-per-day multivitamin and the daily recommended amount of omega-3. Having the supplements individually packaged makes them perfect for the on-the-go lifestyle of your student. It’s easy to grab a packet and put it in a backpack, purse, or pocket to take with a meal. Plus the packets remove guesswork and thinking—simply take one packet-full per day with any meal. That’s easy to remember.

Why Basic One Iron-Free?
Most nutrition experts agree that a balanced, nutritious diet is the best way to obtain needed nutrients. The recommended amount of fruits and vegetables per day is five servings (nine is even better!), yet the average teenager only eats 1.6 servings! A recent report from the University College London stated that eating seven or more portions of fruits and vegetables a day reduces your risk of death at any point in time by 42 percent compared to eating less than one portion. Supplements are not intended to replace a healthy diet and lifestyle, but taking a multivitamin can provide a convenient way to “bridge the nutritional gap” and address micronutrient inadequacies that may well occur when your child is suddenly away from home. Also, while girls tend to stop growing sooner, it is possible that your son’s body is still growing and developing. This makes it even more important for them to obtain the proper nutrients. Here are a few of the vitamins included in Basic One Iron-Free.

Vitamin A promotes normal bone growth and tooth development, healthy skin and assists in night and color vision.

Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron, strengthens connective tissue, muscles and skin and increases resistance to infection.

Vitamin D promotes tooth and bone formation and aids in the absorption of minerals like calcium. While you can get vitamin D naturally from sunlight, a study by Weill Cornell Medical Center found one in seven adolescents were vitamin D deficient. Cooper Clinic suggests at least 2000 IU per day which is the amount in our daily multivitamin.

Why Advanced Omega-3?
Omega-3 has shown to help with brain health (reduce depression) and heart health. The American Heart Association recommends eating fatty-fish such as salmon at least two times per week. One study found that fish oil (in foods or supplements) cut the risk of death from cardiovascular disease by 32 percent. Buying fish can be expensive and is generally not conducive to the typical college lifestyle so taking an omega supplement is highly recommended.

When you’re preparing the next care package for your college student, sneak in a Cooper Complete Healthy Body Pack to keep them on track. For more information about Cooper Complete products, click here.

What’s New About the Proposed New Food Labels?

Earlier this year the U.S. Food and Drug Administration made a formal proposal to update the “nutrition facts” labels on food products to more accurately reflect the current health concerns and eating habits of Americans. These changes will update the current labels that have been around for the past 20 years and will be based on the most current and reliable science.

Americans are now increasingly health conscious and more interested in what’s in their food. Research has shown that between 2007 and 2014, there has been an 8% increase in reading food labels in the age group of 29-68 year olds. Revising the current labels to be more easily decipherable will make it easier for consumers to better understand what to look for when making informed food choices.

The future proposed changes are in the following areas.

Serving Size. Many of the serving sizes will be increased to more realistically reflect how much people actually eat. For example, the current label on a carton of ice cream lists a standard serving as half a cup, but most people typically eat more than half a cup. Read tips to control your portions.

Total Calories. Total calories will be listed more prominently and possibly in bold print towards the top of the new label. The number of calories is one of the most important things to note. While Americans’ waist lines are ever expanding, it’s become increasingly important to pay more attention to calories consumed. It will also make calorie counting easier.

Calories from Fat. This line will be removed from the new labels which will focus more attention on the breakdown of fats. Research shows that the type of fat is more important than the calories from fat. Labels will continue to list total fat, saturated and trans fat.

Sugars. The new labels will note how much added sugar is in the product. At this time, you cannot differentiate how much sugar comes from added sugars versus natural sources found in fruit and milk. This will make it easier for Americans to follow the American Heart Association’s guidelines for limiting added sugar. The recommendations state that men should consume no more than 150 calories a day from added sugar and women no more than 100 calories a day from added sugar.

Daily Values. There will also be updates to sodium, dietary fiber, vitamin D, potassium, calcium and iron. These will be based on the current needs that have changed over the 20 year period.

With more than a third of Americans obese, paying more attention to the labels in their new and improved format is great news! Studies show that people who read labels tend to eat more healthfully. Food knowledge can be a powerful tool!

For information about Cooper Clinic Nutrition services, click here or call 972.560.2655.

Weddings at Cooper Hotel

By: Savannah Reppart, Events Manager at Cooper Hotel

Wedding season is in full-swing at Cooper Hotel & Conference Center. We host weddings with tented outdoor receptions, indoor receptions and plenty of ceremonies in between. If you are looking for a place for your special day, take a look at some of the memories captured at Cooper Hotel.

Outdoor Receptions

With a 30-acre green campus in the middle of Dallas, outdoor weddings are quite popular here. Last summer we celebrated a beautiful classic wedding with navy linens, gold chiavari chairs and summer floral arrangements.

20120621-101017.jpg

20120621-101017.jpg

With inspiration from Pinterest—we hosted a rustic chic wedding, which has been a popular wedding theme. Decorated with unique burlap accents, crystal chandeliers and sunflowers the wedding was a success.

20120621-101017.jpg

One of my favorite weddings to plan, was a traditional Indian ceremony. The stage under the tent captured the bride’s personality with lots of fuchsia and gold accents. The ceiling was fully draped and lit with sparkling lights and was a night to remember for all. See the wedding featured in Bollywood Magazine here.

20120621-101017.jpg

Indoor Receptions

With the recent renovations at Cooper Hotel, the calendar is filling up quickly! View photos of the $1 million renovation in progress. Indoor receptions are comfortably planned for up to 250 guests. With full-service catering, Cooper Hotel gives the option to provide your own bar beverages. Cooper Hotel’s exemplary staff hosts the ideal environment to relax and celebrate your day.

20120621-101017.jpg

To learn more about weddings at Cooper Hotel, join us at the Dallas Bridal Show on July 26-27 at the Dallas Market Center.

Download Wedding Brochure | View Photos | Follow Cooper Hotel Weddings on Pinterest

Have a Happy, Healthy Fourth!

Are you getting enough fruit each day? Men should have 2 cups/day and women should have 1.5-2 cups/day. Make half your plate fruits and veggies!

Do you love barbeque? Although the healthy options are usually limited at your favorite barbeque joint, you can keep it under control by finding a good balance. Cooper Clinic Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, Colleen Loveland, MS, RDN, LD, CDE, offers some healthy tips to enjoy the barbeque season.

Barbeque Restaurants
Barbeque isn’t known for being healthy, but there are healthier options out there. When choosing meat, try smoked barbeque turkey. This choice has 6 g of saturated fat versus 13 g in brisket. Turkey is a great option to get the smokey flavor without the calories and fat. Instead of ribs, which has 15 g of saturated fat, try a pulled pork sandwich. This only has 8 g of saturated fat. If you can, split your meal with a friend. Not only should you make the leaner meat choice but beware of the side items. Creamed corn, macaroni and cheese, breaded okra and potato salad will easily contain 20 g of saturated fat. The best solution is to opt for steamed vegetables or a salad with the dressing or sauce on the side. Remember to drizzle your dressing and not drench.

Barbeque at Home
To avoid restaurants’ less healthy options, throw a healthier barbeque bash at home. Having options and using your imagination can create many healthy choices. Switch from burgers and brats to kebabs. Use lean meat, chicken, tofu or fish but in smaller portions. Try alternating meat with a variety of vegetables like cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, onions, peppers, zucchini and yellow squash. Add fruit to the mix by adding pineapple and apple slices. For the juicy taste and texture, find a reduced-calorie marinade or brush a little olive oil on your favorite meat or vegetables.

Side Dishes

Cooper Clinic recommends filling half of your plate with vegetables, which happen to taste great when grilled. Throw a corn on the cob on the grill for a side dish. Did you know it’s a whole grain? Instead of a baked potato with the unhealthy fillings, try boiling new potatoes seasoned with olive oil, salt, pepper and garlic. Try this recipe for a healthier version of a barbeque favorite, coleslaw.

Sauces
When it comes to barbeque sauce, always choose them on the side to help limit sodium, fat and calories. By drizzling small amounts, you are in control of how much goes on your dish. Also try dipping your fork in the sauce first and then pick up your food. You will use a third of what you would normally pour. Always limit cream-, butter-or cheese-based sauces.

Now, let’s get to grilling! Meridan Zerner, MS, RDN, CSSD, LD, Cooper Clinic Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, shares the healthiest ways to grill your favorite meats and vegetables this summer.

View recipes from Cooper Clinic dietitians to make your Fourth of July celebration a healthy one.

For more information about Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services or to schedule an appointment with a registered dietitian, click here or call 972.560.2655.

BIG Things Happen at Cooper!

Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper, Founder and Chairman, Cooper Aerobics

Have you seen the B&G letters around the city of Dallas? When you stand in between the B&G (like Dr. Cooper here), the six foot tall letters spell BIG! These letters are part of the Dallas Convention & Visitors Bureau (Dallas CVB) branding campaign “Big Things Happen Here!”  Now until July 7, we at Cooper Aerobics have our own set on campus.  Prior to joining the Cooper Aerobics team as Vice President of Marketing and Communications, I worked as a VP for the Dallas CVB on its rebranding campaign. Two years ago we conducted research studies alongside TracyLocke with residents and visitors alike to determine our city’s new tagline. At Dallas’ brand launch event in March of 2013, the life-size letters were part of a four-week social media contest but have gained popularity resulting in more than two dozen sets across the city a year and half later. Thousands of photos have been shared on social media with #DallasBIG. As I made the transition to Cooper Aerobics earlier this year, I quickly found out that BIG things happen every day on the Cooper Aerobics campus.

Cooper Fitness Center completed a $7.5 million renovation in February and the Cooper Hotel is in the final stage of its $1 million renovation.  Just this week, Olympic Bob Sledder Johnny Quinn shared his story to more than 40 youth campers and last week Olympic Speed Skater Jordan Malone joined Summer Camp at Cooper Fitness Center. Our concierge medicine program Cooper Clinic Platinum announced a third physician joining that practice and Cooper Consulting Partners recently hosted a Fit:Business Seminar, just to name a few.

See photos of members, patients, guests, campers and teammates (employees) in the B&G on the Cooper Aerobics campus. Share your spirit to Get Cooperized by taking a photo between the B&G. Share with us on social media with #DallasBIG and @CooperAerobics.

 

Eating Well in College

Eating healthfully at college may seem like an impossible task but with the right knowledge and resources it can be done. Often times, students don’t focus on their diet with all the excitement that goes with leaving home for college and gaining new independence.

One of the things you can avoid is the dreaded “Freshman 15.” It’s pretty common for students to pack on pounds, especially that first year. Like a kid in a candy store, you are introduced to large amounts of ready-to-eat food available 24 hours a day. To avoid weight gain, try these tips:

  1. Put yourself on a schedule. Eating every 3-5 hours during the day makes it easier to avoid the out-of-control eating when hunger hits.
  2. Watch the grazing. Be sure to eat your balanced meals and planned snacks so the calories are better controlled.
  3. Include breakfast daily. Eat within an hour of waking to boost your metabolism and help control indulging late in the day. (Note: Breakfast recipes from Cooper Clinic)
  4. Be aware of non-hunger cues that make you want to eat. Food can be a great comfort for emotions and used for: coping, celebrating, relaxing, procrastinating and a part of socializing. Make sure you sit down and focus on eating rather than eating while doing other tasks. Mindless eating can lead to extra calories.
  5. Pay attention to the calories in alcohol which can lead to weight gain. It’s not only the empty calories from alcohol but also the munchies that often accompany drinking contribute to weight gain. Never drink on an empty stomach alternate each caloric beverage with water or seltzer and dilute the drink with water. Don’t forget, it’s always acceptable to decline a drink.

You can learn more about nutrition to make smarter choices to fuel your body for your college experience. Before you leave home, visit a nutrition expert at Cooper Clinic to learn the nutrition basics. Our Registered Dietitian Nutritionists can arm you with tools to balance your meals and snacks, choose appropriate portions, navigate social eating situations and make it easy to enjoy a healthy lifestyle during college and for years to come.

For more information about nutrition consultations at Cooper Clinic, click here or call 972-560-2655.

Post provided by Colleen Loveland, MS, RDN, LD, CDE

Happy Father’s Day From Cooper Aerobics!

Father’s Day is well-celebrated at Cooper Aerobics. Not only because we are a family-owned business, but also because of our Founder and Chairman, Dr. Cooper, is the ‘father of aerobics.’ Dr. Tyler Cooper, Cooper Aerobics’ Chief Executive Officer and son of Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper, shared a video tribute of his father’s legacy with their home church, Prestonwood Baptist.

More than 45 years ago, Kenneth H. Cooper, MD, MPH published his first book in 1968. When discussing the title with his publisher, Dr. Cooper said the title Aerobics would never catch on and would be mispronounced and misspelled. After a little convincing, it was decided as the title of his first of 19 books. Aerobics has now been translated in 41 languages, including braille, and is well-known around the world. In 1986 Dr. Cooper’s submission for the official definition of ‘aerobics’ appeared within the Oxford English Dictionary.

Happy Father’s Day from Drs. Cooper and all of the Cooper Aerobics family!

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 11,270 other followers