Home > Nutrition > All Fruits can Fit, Even with Diabetes

All Fruits can Fit, Even with Diabetes

Diabetic Friendly FruitHave you ever wondered if fruit is healthy to eat when you have diabetes or prediabetes? It is! Fruits are packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber, much like vegetables. Since fruit contains carbohydrates and turns to sugar, it’s wise not to eat with utter abandon. The total number of carbohydrates affects your blood sugars, regardless of whether the source is from sugar or starch.

Another common myth is that you should not eat certain types of fruit, either because they taste very sweet or contain too much sugar. The truth is all fruits contain sugar and can fit into your meal plan – the key is how much you eat! One serving contains 15 grams of carbohydrate. The serving size depends on the amount of carbohydrates in the fruit. Some fruits have more carbohydrates than others, but as long as you eat one serving, your blood sugar will be affected the same amount.

Here are some examples of 15 grams of carbohydrates of fruit:

  • 1 ¼ cup whole strawberries or chopped watermelon
  • 1 cup raspberries or chopped cantaloupe or honeydew
  • ¾ cup blueberries, blackberries or fresh pineapple
  • 1 small apple, orange or kiwi
  • 17 small grapes
  • 2 Tbsp. dried fruit (raisins, cranberries, mixed dried fruit)
  • 2 Clementines or small plums
  • ½ cup mixed fresh fruit
  • ½ large banana or grapefruit

Things to remember:

  • Aim for two to four servings of fruit per day.
  • Choose whole produce in favor of juice.
  • Make sure canned fruit is in its own juice.
  • Dried fruit is convenient, but the serving size is a fraction of the fresh version.
  • Frozen fruit is a great option for off season.
  • Go for variety and try to capture all the colors of the rainbow to maximize antioxidant (cancer fighting) benefits.

When you are trying to incorporate more fruit into your diet, try ready-to-go precut fruit for convenience. You can pack one or two pieces of fruit from home each day and have one with lunch and the other for a snack. Fruit is also makes for a great after dinner treat.

If you have diabetes or prediabetes you can eat fruit with confidence because it’s nutrient dense and a great way to get your sweet fix.

  1. doye bayird jr
    December 10, 2012 at 5:17 pm

    bought some medjool dates in a container no nutrient in fo on there i am guessing treat them like raisins . there kind of dry. tks

  2. December 12, 2012 at 2:46 pm

    Thanks for your comment. The package of medjool dates states that one serving is four pieces of fruit and contains 277 calories and 75 g of carbohydrates. Keep in mind that a serving of fruit has 15 g of carbohydrate, therefore each date has 19 g of carbohydrate. In essence, a recommended serving of this fruit is one piece. When there is no nutrient info on the label, you can go online and obtain this information.

    source of nutrition data: http://www.livestrong.com

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