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Posts Tagged ‘cooper aerobics center’

10 Ways to Eat More Veggies

Eat more fruits and veggiesMany of us seem to do really well getting vegetables or fruits in our daily eating, but not necessarily both. One-half cup of cooked vegetables, or one cup of fresh vegetables or greens counts as one serving towards our goal of “five a day”. Registered dietitian at Cooper Clinic Kathy Duran-Thal shares ten helpful ways to work more veggies into your daily diet.

1. Eat twice the servings of vegetables as starches per meal. In other words, 2 cups vegetables for 1 cup of rice, pasta or potato.

2. Strive to have one colorful, veggie-packed salad each day. Suggestions: dark leafy greens (spinach, kale), mixed leaf lettuce, shredded red cabbage, broccoli slaw, carrots, bell peppers, celery, cherry tomatoes, cucumber and red onion.

3. Eat two or more meatless, vegetable-rich meals a week.

4. Keep fresh veggies handy for quick and easy snacks. Sugar snap peas, carrots, bell pepper slices and celery sticks are easy on-the-go snacks. Also carrots and celery sticks will stay fresh for several days in a container of water in the refrigerator.

5. Add fresh veggies to tuna or chicken salad. Popular ingredients include onion, celery, water chestnuts, etc. We’re talking veggies today, but apple slices or Ocean Spray Craisins (cranraisins) are also delicious.

6. Add vegetables to sandwiches. Opt for onions, bell peppers, bean sprouts, cucumber, tomato and lettuce. Build your sandwich like a local sub—shop and pile your veggies a mile high. Remember, vegetables not only add nutrients, color, flavor and volume, but they fill us up!

7. Add vegetables to your pot of beans—canned or fresh tomatoes, onion, carrots and celery.

8. Make your homemade soups and stocks chock full of your favorite vegetables. Cabbage, bok choy, spinach, carrots, onion, celery and tomatoes are great in a slow cooker.

9. Prepare a “stir-fry” and try experimenting with some new and exciting vegetables to tempt your palate while broadening your cooking horizons. We like bok choy, bean sprouts, bamboo shoots, carrots, scallions, celery, kale, water chestnuts, and various colorful peppers, including jalapenos.

10. Add some flavor pizzazz to your vegetables by sprinkling on a zesty seasoning blend or melting an ounce of grated cheese over the top. Try spritzing lemon on broccoli, glazed carrots, or baked asparagus, topping cauliflower with Gruyere cheese (1 ounce grated cheese will flavor an entire head of cauliflower), and sprinkling tarragon on squash and zucchini and thyme on baked sweet onions.

For more information about Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services or to schedule a nutrition consultation, click here or call 972.560.2655.

Orienteering at Cooper Fitness Center

September 19, 2013 1 comment

If you’re looking for a fun activity for your child’s birthday, their youth group or class team building Orienteering may be the way to go. Cooper Fitness Center Personal Fitness Trainer Shannon Edwards, M.S., leader of the Orienteering programs, gives us an inside look.

Orienteering mixes physical activity, brain power, fun and teamwork to help groups find trust, guidance, communication and encouragement. Orienteering in it’s true sense is a cross country race in which participants use a map and compass to navigate between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. It is very task oriented and ideal for small groups to compete in teams of five people or less. Group orienteering requires excellent communications skills and group cooperation to efficiently accomplish the mission of course navigation. Whatever obstacles or problems the group may encounter must be overcome and solved with only the use of group communication, compass, and map—which are important skill sets for children to learn early!

At the Cooper Aerobics Center  which is 30 acres, any given orienteering course will cover between 3-5 miles! Kids get a cardiovascular workout that is outdoors, mission based—and fun too.

There are two forms of Orienteering at Cooper Fitness Center:

The Scavenger Hunt is for small groups who will navigate a specific course with a map and compass.

The Blind Navigation requires one group to successfully plot coordinates on a map and relay the correct course navigation to teammates on the course that don’t have the benefit of seeing the map.

Leadership skills, listening skills and critical thinking under pressure are necessary for both styles of orienteering. No matter what style of orienteering you choose, fun is the main ingredient for both.

Cooper Fitness Center hosts orienteering events for church groups, sport teams, girl/boy scout groups, companies, and even youth birthday parties. Click here to see the flyer.

To schedule your group’s Orienteering, please email or call 972.233.4832, ext. 6402.

Summer Camps Offer Play With a Purpose

July 23, 2013 1 comment

Meridan Zerner, MS, RD, CSSD, LD, Cooper Clinic registered dietitian makes learning about nutrition fun at camp.

Summer is in full swing and our phones haven’t stopped ringing from parents hoping our Summer Fit & Fun Camp is the perfect day-camp for their child. Parents typically call for a camp that will keep their kids away from video games and TV. Cooper Fitness Center Assistant General Manager Meredith Rosson says parents ask what sets our camps apart from other camps and she loves having the opportunity to tell them.

1. Our philosophy is to keep kids active all day with exposure to various sports. Our Kids Camp and Youth Camp are the sample platters on our camp menu. In these day-camps children in both age groups will try new sports like lacrosse, field hockey, tennis, volleyball, disc golf and handball. This helps kids who might not excel in traditional sports like basketball or soccer, find something they feel comfortable with.

2. We provide a safe and encouraging environment within our day-camps for children to try these new activities. On the first day of camp our counselors emphasize how important it is to try new sports and how imperative it is to encourage one another. Children’s sports become so competitive at such a young age now, our camps provide a less competitive and more encouraging atmosphere to just have fun playing, not competing.

3. It’s not just sports–it’s games too! Some of our non-traditional games like Pilo polo, Last Man Standing, Nukem, and relay races are camp favorites. These games are great for the kids to share in their neighborhoods or recess with friends. They also works on the basic motor development skills children need to transfer to future athletic endeavors.

4. Our Counselors. Our Counselors go through three rounds of interviews and a background check to make sure they are just the right fit for our camp. We look for individuals that show a passion for uplifting children in a complete wellness manner. We maintain a 10:1 ratio of kids to Counselors and we also have Junior Counselors assisting. We ensure your children are safe and surrounded by individuals that want to be good influences in your child’s life.

5. Nutrition and fitness is made fun. We have experts in certain fitness and nutrition areas to complete the wellness picture in a kid-friendly 30-minute lesson. One of our popular lessons is led by Meridan Zerner, MS, RD, CSSD, LD, Registered Dietitian at Cooper Clinic. She provides lessons that cover topics, like learning to “eat the rainbow” or what foods make you “leaner, stronger, faster, smarter.”

Another popular activity is the Friday Orienteering Scavenger Hunt with Shannon Edwards, Director of IGNITE! at Cooper Fitness Center. Shannon has always loved adventure and with the creation of his orienteering programs for kids, our campers have loved their Friday scavenger hunt. For the thrill of the hunt, they don’t mind running around our 30-acre campus to lead their team to victory.

6. Every day is different! I often hear from parents that their child got bored at other camps because every day was the same. We do our best to ensure that doesn’t happen. During our Counselor training we take several hours to plan out the entire summer and ensure that we make each day different.

7. Tailor it to your needs! Our sport specific camps like Soccer Camp, Tennis Camp, Basketball Camp and Dance Camps are weeklong camps that last one to two hours per day. If you are looking for a day-camp, you can pair a sport camp with our day-camps. We will ensure your child is at the right place and right time for each activity. This allows a heavier focus on their technical skills in a specific sport, which are coached by one of our Sports Pros, while also enjoying the remainder of their day at Youth Camp or Kids Camp.

8. It is affordable. Comparable to most YMCA camps, our day camps provide a “play with a purpose” philosophy without the high price of many sport and wellness programs. This allows parents to be able to sign their children up for multiple weeks at our day-camps without breaking the bank.

Most importantly we have fun! Summer is a time for kids to be kids and we want them to enjoy their summer break with fond memories of summer camp. For more information visit our website.

The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Honors Dr. Kenneth Cooper

January 31, 2013 1 comment

Evening of ExcellenceToday, Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper is heading to his alma mater, The University of Oklahoma, to be honored by the College of Medicine Alumni Association at its annual Evening of Excellence dinner. Dr. Cooper is an Oklahoma native and was a former track star at the university. He earned a Bachelor of Science from the University of Oklahoma and then received his medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.

The Evening of Excellence dinner recognizes three remarkable and inspiring individuals who have provided outstanding medical and community service. Dr. Cooper is receiving the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Medical Service for his work to revolutionize health and fitness through the practice of preventive medicine.

Evening of Excellence“Receiving the Outstanding Alumni Award from my alma mater, The University of Oklahoma’s School of Medicine, is without question one of the highest honors I have ever received. I am indebted to the members of the Alumni Association who made this possible,” says Dr. Cooper.

Philanthropists Peggy and Charles Stephenson and the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust will also be honored.

Join us in congratulating Dr. Cooper on receiving this award for his continual work to improve lives across the world!