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Stand Up to Cancer Through Prevention

September 9, 2016 3 comments

By: Cynthanne Duryea, RDN, LD

According to a study from JAMA Oncology, half of all cancer deaths are preventable. This is great news, but currently in the United States one person per minute loses their life to cancer. We must empower ourselves through cancer prevention, education and making lifestyle changes to lead healthier lives.

American Cancer Society (ACS) serves as one of many resources for Stand Up To Cancer and provides “Guidelines on Nutrition and Physical Activity” to prevent overall cancer risk. The four cornerstones are:

  1. Achieve and maintain a healthy weight throughout life. However, for those who are overweight or obese, losing even a small amount of weight has benefits and is a good place to start.
  2. Be physically active. Specifically, ACS recommends adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity per week, ideally spread throughout the week. Sedentary behavior such as sitting, lying down, television watching and other forms of screen-based sedentary entertainment should be limited.
  3. Eat a healthy diet, with emphasis on plant food. Further advice in this area includes:
    • Choose foods and drinks in amounts that help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight.
    • Limit the amount of processed meat (such as lunch meats and cold cuts) and red meat in your diet.
    • Eat at least 2½ cups of vegetables and fruits daily, amounting to 5-9 servings.
    • Choose whole grains over refined grain products.
  1. If you drink alcohol, limit your intake. ACS recommends no more than one drink per day for women or two per day for men.

Some of these recommendations may seem familiar, as they overlap some of the guidelines for healthy blood pressure, optimal heart health and diabetes prevention. So, following them not only reduces your overall cancer risk, but can prevent other chronic diseases. The key is how to implement these guidelines.

My Story and Experiences

As a registered dietitian nutritionist who is a breast cancer survivor, I now view nutrition and fitness quite differently than I did prior to my diagnosis. Don’t get me wrong….I ate purposefully for the most part, aiming to eat a variety of nutritious foods and only eating more indulgent foods on the weekends. I have also always enjoyed being physically active, but my diagnosis changed the way I think about food and activity.

Although I have maintained a healthy weight most of my adult life, I am at an age where this is more of a challenge than ever before. As much as I enjoy sweets, my intake has been markedly decreased. Savoring a special sweet treat on a weekend is much more rewarding than grabbing some ordinary boxed cookie from my pantry regularly…and results in not consuming extra calories routinely.

Exercise, as mentioned earlier, was something I always did for stress relief, bone density improvement and to preserve muscle mass. But now I view exercise as a soldier that will help me fight off cancer risks, and vast research proves the power of exercise in the war against cancers. So, rain or shine, tired or energetic, I diligently plow through workouts, visualizing the strength I gain from exercise to beat cancer and win.

I also pay a bit more for minimally-processed meats with no added nitrites to use in sandwiches. Ideally, when time allows, I slice up freshly-prepared meats for sandwiches instead of packaged lunch meats.

Colorful fruits and vegetables are my plant “superheroes.” They contain nutrients and antioxidants that can decrease cancer cell formation and actually inhibit the growth of microscopic cancers. Now I hyper-focus on fruits and vegetables, recognizing they are part of my “armor” in the battle of avoiding reoccurrence.

My grain choices have primarily been whole grain for years, but now I aim to have all my grain products be 100 percent whole-grain products. I also enjoy experimenting with various grains in the kitchen.

Cynthanne’s Personal Strategies and Favorite Food Products to Fight Cancer

For minimally-processed sandwich meats:

  • Applegate Natural and Organic Meats
  • Use freshly sliced prepared meats/poultry as a Deli meat replacement.

To ensure a minimum of 2 ½ cups of vegetables and fruits (but the more the better!):

  • Create “meal patterns” such as one fruit serving at breakfast; one vegetable serving at lunch; one fruit serving as part of afternoon snack; and one fruit and two cups of cooked or raw vegetables with dinner. Added bonus–when ordering an entrée salad out, ask for spinach as your lettuce greens to boost the nutrient content.
  • Favorite food products:
    • Any unsweetened frozen berries/fruits to add to smoothies
    • Reduced sodium canned beans
    • Trader Joe’s Healthy 8 (a colorful blend of eight fresh vegetables finely chopped; sold in the refrigerated produce section; makes a fantastic Asian slaw with added edamame and slivered almonds).

To increase whole grains:

  • Uncle Sam’s Cereal and Post Shredded Wheat are both low sugar cereals and are 100 percent whole-wheat products. Topped with berries, they are satiating powerhouses.
  • Ezekiel Breads. My personal favorite is toasted Ezekiel Cinnamon and Raisin bread topped with almond butter and sliced banana.
  • Ronzoni Healthy Harvest 100% whole-grain pasta. Top it with a bottled marinara sauce of your choice for ease, but add fresh mushrooms, diced bell pepper, canned tomatoes and sliced olives to add more nutrients.
  • McCann’s Steel Cut Irish Oatmeal with Bob’s Red Mill Oat Bran cooked together with diced apples, pears and assorted dried fruits added to the cooking water. Topped with nuts, this makes a most satisfying breakfast!

These are just a few practical ideas I hope help you implement the American Cancer Society Guidelines and lessen your cancer risk as well as other disease risk. Bon appetite!

For more information about Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services, visit cooperclinicnutrition.com or call 972.560.2655.

Cooper Connections at the 2016 Summer Olympic Games

The closing ceremony of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games is finally upon us, following countless displays of athleticism and sportsmanship these past two weeks.  The United States leads the final medal count, with American athletes earning 121 total medals – 46 gold, 37 silver and 38 bronze. We take a look back now at some fun facts and Cooper connections to the celebrated Olympic Games through the years.

  • Did you know Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper was selected to participate in the Olympic torch relay through Arlington, Texas, for the 1996 Summer Olympic Games held in Atlanta, Georgia? Prior to every Olympic Games, the Olympic flame is transported with the Olympic torch from Greece to the designated host city via the Olympic torch relay.DrCooperOlympicsTorchRelay
  • This year was the first time that Brazil served as host for the Olympic Games. Dr. Kenneth Cooper has visited Brazil many times and first traveled to Brazil to train the Brazilian national soccer team with Coach Cláudio Coutinho in 1970. That year the Brazilian national team went on to win the World Cup, and because of Dr. Cooper’s introduction of aerobic exercising to Brazil, in Brazil they refer to “jogging” as “Coopering” or “doing your Cooper.”
  • The five Olympic Rings symbolize the five regions of the world: Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe and the Americas. At least one of the colors of the Olympic rings – blue, yellow, black, green and red – appears in every flag in the world. Dr. Cooper’s message has reached almost every corner of these regions; his 19 books have been sold in 52 countries and translated into 40 languages. The most recent book, Start Strong, Finish Strong, was co-authored with his son, Tyler Cooper, MD, MPH, President and CEO of Cooper Aerobics.
  • Of the 28 sports in the Summer Olympics, Cooper Fitness Center Sports Pros offer training in five of these sports – aquatics, basketball, boxing, martial arts and tennis. You may not be an Olympian, but you can certainly train like one at Cooper.
  • The Olympic motto is “Citius, Altius, Fortius.” When translated from Latin to English it means “Faster, Higher, Stronger.” Most athletes make use of the top five aerobic exercises – cross-country skiing, swimming, running/jogging, outdoor cycling and walking – in their training to help them build endurance for optimal performance. Training with one of our 28 professional fitness trainers at Cooper Fitness Center can help you become faster, higher and stronger.
  • There is no limit to the number of athletes a team can bring to the Olympics; nations can bring any and every athlete that qualifies. Did you know Cooper Fitness Center Boxing Pro Derrick James accompanied boxer Errol Spence, Jr. to the London 2012 Summer Olympics? 

     

    Fitness has been the foundation of Dr. Cooper’s teachings since 1968 when he coined the term “aerobics” and sparked an international fitness revolution. We hope you’ll learn more about Cooper Aerobics and Dr. Cooper’s 8 Steps to Get Cooperized as the sun sets on the Olympic Games in Rio and the countdown begins for the next Olympic Games – 547 days and counting until PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympics, followed by Tokyo 2020 for the next Summer Olympic Games.

Prevention and Safety While Traveling Abroad

Traveling to a foreign country for a large, global event such as the Olympics, holiday events and more requires much preparation in order to stay safe and healthy through the duration of the trip. Michele Kettles, MD, MSPH, Chief Medical Officer of Cooper Clinic, offers tips for travelers embarking on journeys abroad.

Pre-Trip Preparation

Once you finalize plans to travel abroad, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website and select the country to which you will be traveling. The website provides information about required vaccinations needed before traveling to the country along with other travel warnings and tips. Dr. Kettles recommends visiting a Passport Health® travel clinic to receive vaccinations and medications specific for the country you are visiting and the activities planned during your trip.

When it comes time to pack for your trip, consider the following:

  • Bring any over-the-counter medications you may need, such as Afrin® or Sudafed®. These can be difficult to obtain in a foreign country.
  • If you’re worried about diarrheal or respiratory issues while traveling, ask your doctor about prescribing an antibiotic. Dr. Kettles recommends a Z-Pak; another antibiotic that is common for travelers, Cipro, is being phased out by many doctors because it can cause harmful side effects.
  • If you’ll be using your cell phone while traveling abroad, talk to your wireless service provider about access in the country you’re traveling to, or if you need to set up an international service plan for your time abroad.
  • Download Google Translate on your phone or portable device if you don’t speak the language of the country you’re traveling to. You’ll want to know how to communicate upon arrival and should an emergency occur during your trip.
  • Make a copy of your passport, and pack it separately from the original. If you become stranded without identification in a foreign country, odds are your stress level will increase dramatically and your vacation may be cut short.
  • Provide a family member or friend with your travel itinerary and contact information for the duration of your trip.

A Safe Trip is a Fun Trip

A safe trip abroad begins while you’re en route to your destination—oftentimes, this can be a long flight. Blood clots, also known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are a primary concern for travelers who must sit on planes for hours at a time. Make sure to stand up and walk around when it is safe to do so, drink plenty of water to stay hydrated and don’t take medication that will leave you asleep for hours on end. Immobilization from sleeping for the duration of a long flight leaves you at a higher risk for blood clots.

Upon arrival, be smart about what you eat and drink. In many countries, tap water and ice may not be safe to drink for visitors. Eating certain foods can be risky as well. If possible, try to eat foods you can wash, peel and cook. Steer clear of foods at buffets and salad bars, as you won’t know how well uncooked food was washed and if it has contaminated other foods around it.

Additionally, go the extra mile to prevent illness and injury. For example, if you’re visiting an area where malaria or the Zika virus is present, taking medication before the trip may not be enough. Wear mosquito-repellent clothing and use sprays and nets to protect yourself, and prevent the risk altogether by avoiding going outside at dusk and dawn, when mosquitos are most active.

Be Aware of Your Surroundings

According to Dr. Kettles, motor vehicle accidents are the number one cause of injury and death to Americans while traveling abroad. Be cautious of how you plan to get around while traveling, because options can vary greatly depending on where you are traveling. Don’t hop on the first form of public transportation you come across—be choosy about motor vehicles you ride in, and make sure to wear a seat belt.

In situations such as the Olympics, Super Bowl or World Cup, it’s important to be diligent about your personal safety. People travel from around the world to attend these events, and criminals do the same. Be aware of your surroundings at all times:

  • Don’t go out at night in strange or unsafe areas
  • Avoid flaunting glamorous clothes or accessories in public
  • Be prepared and knowledgeable about where you are going—try not to look like an obvious target if you are lost or unsure about something

Be Prepared for the Worst

It never hurts to be overly prepared and cautious when it comes to your health and safety, especially when traveling away from home. Bringing your medical records with you to a foreign country is a good idea, especially if you have a significant medical condition. At the very least, make sure to carry a complete list of medications and brief medical history summary.

If you suffer an injury or illness and end up in a hospital in a foreign country, it’s important to be aware of your treatments. Depending on where you are, the blood supply at the hospital may not be as well policed as it is in the United States. Screening blood for HIV, hepatitis and other infections varies country to country. If you can avoid blood transfusions and any use of needles, it is best to do so.

Being up-to-date on all common vaccinations in the United States can help reduce your risk of infection in another country, but being prepared for specific risks is key to having an enjoyable and safe trip abroad. For more information about Cooper Clinic, visit cooper-clinic.com or call 972.560.2667.

Travel insurance can be a smart purchase, especially for expensive trips or places where medical evacuation could be needed.  These policies are now widely available.

For more health tips articles, visit cooperaerobics.com.

Conquering the Summer Camp Swim Test

Sneakers? Sunscreen? Sleeping bag? All may be necessary items for summer camp, but children should also be armed with top-notch swim skills. Cooper Fitness Center Swim Pro Marni Kerner helps kids of all ages prepare for swim tests that are often required at summer day camps and overnight camps.

Each test varies in length and intensity. Some require a child to swim the length or width of a pool, but others require performing all four competitive strokes–freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke and butterfly–in open water situations. If a child is unable to pass the designated swim test, he or she may have limited access to water activities throughout the duration of the camp, or may be required to wear a life jacket when swimming in a pool or open water.

Training with a certified swim instructor prior to taking a swim test has numerous benefits:

  • Sharpens the child’s skills early in the summer, since it has likely been a while since the child has swam longer distances
  • Introduces specific stroke training to those who may not be familiar with all four competitive strokes
  • Increases physical strength and endurance
  • Improves stroke techniques
  • Builds confidence in the swimmer

In addition to working on swim skills, each swimmer also learns water safety and rest strokes, including how to bob and tread water in order to conserve energy.

Children may only need one lesson to refresh their swim skills, but others may take up to five or six lessons to prepare for their specific test. The time and effort invested is worth it so the kids can enjoy an exciting and safe summer in the water.

For more information about Cooper Fitness Center swim programs, visit cooperswimacademy.com or call Swim Pro Marni Kerner at 972.233.4832, ext. 5447.

10 Reasons Why Female Focus Benefits Women’s Health

Cooper Fitness Center

Since 2006, hundreds of women each year have participated in more than 3,000 Female Focus classes, a science-based small group training program designed to help women exercise to gain strength as they manage diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, fibromyalgia, heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

The women who have participated in Female Focus throughout the past 10 years listed the top 10 reasons why the program has benefitted both their physical and mental health:

  1. A sense of accountability to health and fitness and provides motivation to work harder both in and outside of class
  2. Camaraderie and support of women going through similar challenges and life experiences
  3. Personal attention from Colette Cole, the director of the program, and other trainers – staff expertise and experience is unmatched
  4. Improved overall strength, posture, balance, mobility, endurance, functional movement and daily activity movement
  5. Weight loss and maintenance
  6. Enjoyment from a variety of fun workouts
  7. Reduction of injury risk and attention to detail regarding training for specific injuries
  8. Sessions are personalized for both exercise and nutrition
  9. Focus on specific women’s health issues, including improvement of bone density
  10. Stress reduction

The program is based on materials and research from Women’s Health and Fitness Guide written by Michele Kettles, MD, MSPH, Chief Medical Officer of Cooper Clinic, and Colette Cole, MS, Cooper Fitness Center Female Focus Director and Professional Fitness Trainer. Under Colette’s guidance, participants learn how to overcome physical and mental challenges that are often a side effect of health issues.

In addition to learning and growing stronger physically, many of the women are drawn to the program because of the bonds they form with each other. Many are going through similar life changes, such as kids going off to college or becoming caretakers of aging parents. They also face similar challenges and are working toward similar goals – to be healthier and happier.

Dr. Jill Ombrello has participated in Female Focus for the past three years. She joined the program because she wanted the accountability of a scheduled and customized workout. However, she had no idea how many additional benefits she would receive as a result.

“Not only did I gain accountability, but I also joined a community of women looking to improve their health in the same ways as me. We are not equally strong or flexible, but Collette creates a different, unique and interesting workout for us every time we attend. In a society where many women are often competing with one another, Colette has created a unique environment where we all feel supported and pushed to achieve greatness.”

For more information about the Female Focus program, visit cooperfitfemale.com.

25 Things You Didn’t Know about Coach Coleman Crawford

Cooper Fitness Center Basketball Pro Coleman Crawford has more than 40 years of coaching experience on top of an impressive playing career. He graduated from the University of North Alabama, where he still holds the career scoring and rebounding averages records. From coaching youth/teen clinics to collegiate teams to NBA Development League and international teams, Coleman is passionate about developing players at all levels. He is especially dedicated to helping youth realize their athletic potential through the sport of basketball.

Winter Basketball Camp_7762

Though Coleman’s resume is impressive, there are many things not listed on his bio that contribute to the great person and coach he is. Read on for 25 facts you didn’t know about Coleman:

  1. The celebrity Coleman would most like to meet is Denzel Washington.
  2. Coleman’s favorite color is black.
  3. Coleman’s two children live in Tallahassee, Fla.
  4. He’s got the facts…Coleman’s favorite subject in school was history.
  5. Zucchini does not make the list of Coleman’s favorite foods. He can’t stand it!
  6. The worst injury Coleman ever had as a player was a double quad tear, which required surgery to repair.
  7. The best gift Coleman ever received was his two sons.
  8. Coleman’s favorite band is The Temptations.
  9. It’s a bird…it’s a plane…it’s superhero Coleman! If he had one superpower, it would be the ability to spread the power of education.
  10. Coleman is most proud of being married to his wife for 34 years.
  11. Ho Ho Ho! Coleman’s favorite holiday is Christmas.
  12. As a teenager, Coleman was a window washer at a shoe store. This gig turned into an even better one when he was asked to be a salesman at the shoe store!
  13. Coleman has lived in other countries, but his favorite place he’s lived is the United States.
  14. If you need someone to help you face your fears, Coleman is the guy! He says he is not afraid of anything.
  15. The thing he misses most about where he grew up is his brothers and sisters.
  16. Coleman’s favorite tasty treat is coconut cake.
  17. The nicest celebrity Coleman has ever met was Michael Jordan.
  18. The most memorable and exciting sporting event Coleman has ever been to was the NCAA Final Four.
  19. If his players learn only one thing from him, Coleman hopes they learn to persevere.
  20. The best thing Coleman cooks is breakfast food.
  21. When he was younger, Coleman wanted to be a lawyer.
  22. Coleman thinks the funniest hairstyle he ever had was a puffy afro.
  23. A fan of sun and surf, Coleman’s favorite family vacation was to the Caribbean.
  24. Some of the most nerve-wracking games Coleman was a part of as a coach or player included a number of Atlantic Coast Conference games.
  25. If he could train under another Cooper Fitness Center sports pro, Coleman would choose boxing with Derrick James.

For more information about Coleman and the basketball programs he offers at Cooper Fitness Center, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com/ProZone.

KO a Heart Healthy Workout for Valentine’s Day

February 12, 2016 Leave a comment

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner, and what better way to spend quality time with your significant other than through an amazing workout. Hitting the gym as a couple is an important part of many relationships – just ask Cooper Fitness Center Boxing Pro Derrick James.

Derrick has Derrick and Tish Boxing Ring35 years of boxing experience and more than 10 years of coaching experience, and he even recorded the fastest KO in American International Boxing history. However, one of the few times Derrick was truly knocked off his feet happened right here at Cooper Fitness Center. Derrick met his wife, Tish, when she worked in the Cooper Fitness Center Business Office, and they have now been married for 10 years. Though dedicated to his boxing routine, Derrick also enjoys quality exercise time with Tish when they walk or jog with their kids.

 

When it comes to breaking a sweat through a tandem workout, Derrick says boxing can be an excellent form of exercise for couples to “knock out” together. Boxing can help both people de-stress, and it can also be a great opportunity for a couple to bond and face the challenge of a new workout. Because many people are so busy with work, kids and other activities, exercising together can give couples extra quality time to reconnect, challenge each other and have a great time while doing so. It’s all about getting better and learning at the same pace as each other, and having a built-in accountability partner can help you both stay on track!

Derrick’s go-to moves for getting his heart pumping through boxing inDerrick and Tish Date Nightclude working combinations on the heavy bag and jumping rope. Boxing can help maintain and improve mobility, and the athletic training works various muscles and makes it an incredible full-body workout. Cardiovascular exercise, including boxing, can decrease your low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol) and blood pressure, improve mood, and reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes.

Let your heart overflow with love this Valentine’s Day while still getting it into fighting shape. For more information about boxing sessions with Derrick at Cooper Fitness Center, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com/prozone.

 

2015 Cooper Fitness Center Member Awards

January 4, 2016 1 comment

Each year, Cooper Fitness Center recognizes members who exemplify the Get Cooperized model and represent Cooper Fitness Center in the best ways possible. This year, we had an incredible pool of nominees as Cooper ambassadors, which made it challenging to select just a few. Congratulations to all of the recipients!

Male of the Year: Don WinspearDon Winspear CFC

Don Winspear is a brave and tenacious role model. After being diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder known as TM (transverse myelitis) in December 2012, Don quickly lost sensation of both his legs and became paralyzed. With his doctor, Dr. Benjamin Greenberg, Don has become an advocate for The CONQUER Project, a collaborative effort working to solve issues for autoimmune patients. He has also worked with his Cooper Fitness Center Professional Fitness Trainer, Louie Herrera, to incorporate recuperation methods for daily function. “Don works out with me on a very consistent basis, and during our training sessions we discuss ways to improve his nutrition and recuperation methods for daily function,” says Louie.

Others within Cooper Fitness Center take note of his determination and dedication as well. “It is truly inspirational to see Don turn a potential adversity into opportunity,” says Lisa Hanley, Cooper Fitness Center Professional Fitness Trainer. “It is a pleasure to work alongside of him.” Don embodies living a Cooperized life as he doesn’t let any obstacles stand in his way. Nominated by many trainers and Cooper Fitness Center members, he is the ideal Cooper Fitness Center Male of the Year.

Female of the Year: Cindy Haas Cindy Haas CFC

Cindy Haas leads her life by example, demonstrating healthy eating habits and a very active lifestyle. She engages with all Cooper Fitness Center members and is especially encouraging and welcoming to new members. Cindy can be found six days a week at Cooper Fitness Center, participating in core classes along with her daily workout and always inviting new members to join her. She is happy, fun and always joking around. You’ll probably catch her around the holidays dressed to impress with a holiday outfit or accessory! She is encouraging and genuinely represents the Cooper Fitness Center Female of the Year.

Youth of the Year: Amanda Esker Amanda Esker CFC

Amanda Esker is a proponent of living a Cooperized life, even at the young age of 12! Amanda has participated in the IGNITE! program since 2011, only missing one session in four years. Her twice-a-week training routine enhances her softball and volleyball performance. According to Shannon Edwards, Cooper Fitness Center Professional Fitness Trainer and director of IGNITE!, Amanda always pushes and challenges herself, and is fiercely committed to her training. She encourages her classmates and is always the first to welcome a new participant. Amanda has conquered all 13 levels of IGNITE!, making her an accomplished and inspiring young athlete.

Most Improved of the Year: Josh Feferman Josh Feferman CFC

Josh Feferman is a walking example of how discipline and commitment to a healthy lifestyle pay off. In the past two years, we’ve seen Josh stick with exercise through many life challenges. He has transformed – grown stronger, made his heart healthier and is now able to recover during physical activity much faster than before. His diet is night and day from what he used to eat, resulting in a loss of more than 20 pounds! Josh embodies determination to live a healthy life and is an ideal choice for Most Improved of the Year.

Classic of the Year: Sudsy Adams Sudsy Adams CFC

Sudsy Adams embraces many roles within Cooper Fitness Center’s Classics program for mature members. She leads by example through her daily workouts, including Classics Pilates and water aerobics. She can also often be found walking the track or swimming during the summer months. According to Jill Samaniego, a Cooper Fitness Center Group Exercise Instructor, Sudsy “is the glue that keeps our early morning seniors together.” Sudsy knows everyone’s birthday and organizes cards and cakes for each one. If a participant is sick, she facilitates the signing of cards and delivering of goodies for “cheering up” purposes. She is also the first one to invite a new member or class participant to join the Classics’ morning coffee group, and even helps them set up their equipment on their first few class days.

Her fellow members say Sudsy is a loving wife, mother and grandmother, and has a heart for service. She volunteers at Medical City Hospital and is active in Highland Park United Methodist Church. “She is an amazing woman and an excellent example of good health, kind spirit and a sound mind that constantly helps others,” says Jill.

Mr. & Mrs. Aerobics: Chuck Day & Susan Randall Mr & Mrs Aerobics CFC

Chuck Day and Susan Randall are committed to a healthy, Cooperized lifestyle–they are accountability partners, and they encourage each other in both fitness and everyday life. The two exercise at Cooper Fitness Center every morning and participate in a well-rounded routine, which flawlessly fits in to their everyday life. The couple that trains together stays together, and Chuck and Susan constantly mix up their workouts and challenge their bodies to get stronger.

Outside of Cooper, Chuck and Susan have created a health and wellness incentive program for their 20 employees, based on programs used at Cooper Fitness Center. Their goal is to have 50 percent participation and to serve as healthy role models to their employees. Susan is also dedicated to helping her 92-year-old father live an active lifestyle – they go on walks together to keep him moving. She and Chuck both have hearts for helping other people live the best and healthiest lives possible.

Activ8 Champion: Vicki Nichols vicki nichols CFC

New this year, a member was recognized for her stellar participation in Cooper Fitness Center’s new wellness program, Activ8. Vicki Nichols has embraced Activ8 since its launch in January 2015, using the skills and knowledge she’s gained through the program to continually enhance her workouts, eating habits and everyday lifestyle. She participates in the Activ8 activities and always asks questions to continue the learning process. She is connected with many other members and always makes a point to continue learning, developing and challenging herself on her fitness journey. Because of her deep enthusiasm and desire to learn and improve, Vicki proved herself to be the Activ8 Champion of 2015.

We are extremely proud of the hard work our members put in to living healthy and active lifestyles, and this year’s award recipients fully embody what it means to Get Cooperized. See the video and photos from the ceremony on the Cooper Fitness Center Facebook page. For more information about Cooper Fitness Center membership, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com/members.

Healthier Gingerbread Cookies

December 11, 2015 1 comment

Gingerbread cookiesMake a “Cooperized” gingerbread man this holiday season with this delicious healthy cookie recipe from Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services! What’s your favorite way to decorate your gingerbread creations?

Ingredients:

Cookies

  • 2 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. ground ginger
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. baking soda
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ¼ tsp. ground nutmeg
  • ½ cup packed brown sugar
  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • 3 Tbsp. molasses
  • 1 large egg
  • Cooking spray

Icing

  • 1 cup sifted powdered sugar
  • 1 Tbsp. water

Directions:

  1. Weigh or lightly spoon flour into measuring cups; level with a knife
  2. Combine flour, ginger and spices in a bowl; stir with a whisk
  3. Combine brown sugar, butter and molasses in a large bowl; beat with  a mixer at medium speed for two minutes
  4. Add eggs; beat well
  5. Add flour mixture to sugar mixture; beat at low speed until well blended
  6. Divide dough in half (dough will be sticky)
  7. Gently press dough into a 4-inch circle on heavy-duty plastic wrap;  cover with additional plastic wrap
  8. Chill 1 ½ hours
  9. Preheat oven to 350
  10. Roll each portion of dough to a 1/8-inch thickness on a floured work surface
  11. Cut with gingerbread man cookie cutter to form 48 cookies
  12. Place cookies one inch apart on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray
  13. Bake at 350 for 8 minutes or until lightly browned
  14. Remove cookies from baking sheet; cool completely on a wire rack
  15. To prepare the icing, combine sifted powdered sugar and 1 Tbsp. water.
  16. Spoon the mixture into a zip-top plastic bag; snip a small hole off the corner of the bag
  17. Pipe icing onto the cookies as desired

CFC Trainer of the Year – Jamie Cochran, ATC

November 30, 2015 1 comment

Jamie-Cochran

Each year, Cooper Fitness Center (CFC) Professional Fitness Trainers nominate one of their teammates who consistently goes above and beyond in their work for the Trainer of the Year Award. This year’s recipient is Jamie Cochran, who has been with CFC since 2012. We sat down with Jamie to find out more about why she loves being a trainer at CFC.

Q: How long have you been a professional fitness trainer, and how long have you been a trainer at Cooper?

A: I’ve worked in the health care/fitness field since 1999. I started out as a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC), working exclusively in sports medicine, specifically high school and collegiate athletics. I earned my personal training certification through the National Academy of Sports Medicine in 2008, and transitioned into personal training in 2010. I found that as my children got older, keeping up a travel schedule with athletic teams was getting harder and harder. As an ATC, I had been writing rehab programs all along, so I decided to move more toward the fitness realm and focus on special populations, which refers to people outside the realm of traditional personal training. These people typically have some “special” consideration that must be observed while training them, for example: rheumatoid arthritis, joint replacements, pre- or post-surgical conditions, Parkinson’s, injury recovery, etc. I came to Cooper Fitness Center in August 2012.

Q: In your own words, what does it mean to be a Cooper Fitness Center Professional Fitness Trainer?

A: As soon as I decided to take my career in the direction of personal training, I knew that I wanted to eventually end up at Cooper. In the health and wellness world, this organization is the gold standard. I’ve enjoyed every aspect of my career, but working here tops it all. Our facility is outstanding, our staff is second to none and our members are awesome! It’s a joy coming to work every day.

Q: What do you think is the most important part of your job as a trainer?

A: By far, the professionalism and level of service that I provide to all of my clients is the most important to me. I take a much more conservative approach to my program design because my niche is special populations. A lot of careful research and time goes into taking care of my clients, and I want to make sure that my approach is always measured, effective and safe.

Q: What is a “typical” day like for you at Cooper Fitness Center?

A: My typical day starts at 5 a.m., and I usually have eight or nine appointments per day. My mornings are usually very busy, but I try to squeeze in an hour to go outside and run on the track when I can. Some days are more booked than others, but I’m typically here until about 4 p.m. every day.

Q: What do you enjoy most about being a trainer?

A: My favorite thing about being a trainer is that my job is never boring or monotonous. Every day is fun and different! Even when I’m very busy, there are always people to laugh and converse with. I took over the Parkinson’s Program a couple months ago and that has been a tremendous blessing. All of my clients are special to me, but working with this group has been especially rewarding.

Q: Why is Cooper Fitness Center a unique place to be a trainer?

A: There is no place like CFC. We have a beautiful campus, great facilities and wonderful members. Our team of Professional Fitness Trainers are collectively the most qualified you’ll find anywhere (maybe the world!).

Q: What does it mean to you to be named CFC Trainer of the Year?

A: I am very honored by this award because it was voted on by my colleagues, who I have a great deal of respect for. Many of them have been in the business quite a bit longer than I have, so I was humbled that they thought enough of me to give me this award.

Q: What is your favorite physical activity/workout?

A: My favorite physical activity is distance running. It’s the one activity I can do to completely disconnect from the world and clear my mind. It’s very therapeutic for me. I’ve run eight half marathons over the years, along with countless other 5Ks and 10Ks. I try to run at least 20-30 miles per week.

Q: What are your favorite hobbies?

A: I love to read. I rarely have time for leisurely reading, but when I get a chance to steal a few moments for myself, that’s what I love to do…even if it’s only for 10 minutes!

Q: What do you like to do after a long day of work?

A: After a long day of work, I’d love to say that I get to take a long soak in a hot bath, but I’m usually rushing off to one of my children’s many sports or school activities or doing homework with them while I cook dinner!