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Posts Tagged ‘Cooper Clinic Dermatology’

Sunscreen Tips from Cooper Clinic Dermatology

Cooper Clinic Dermatology offers the top sunscreen tips to keep you covered from head to toe this summer (and year-round).

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Spring Skincare Tips from Cooper Spa Dallas

March 21, 2016 1 comment

Spring is here! As the seasons change, so should your skincare routine. Cooper Spa Dallas Manager Lisa Boyle shares skincare recommendations to implement for healthy, radiant skin this spring.Facial_CooperSpa_SDIL8670-Edit

Year-round exfoliation is ideal, but spring is a great time for a chemical facial peel. Spring peels can help shed dry winter skin caused by cold temperatures and brighten complexions for spring.

What is a chemical facial peel? A chemical facial peel is an exfoliating agent that typically contains alpha hydroxy acids and/or beta hydroxy acids. Acids break down the bond between healthy and dead skin cells, allowing the dead cells to shed.

Today’s chemical exfoliators are used in a controlled manner and provide a safe method for revealing healthy and renewed skin. Chemical peels (which typically do not have “down time” if received in a spa setting) can make skin smoother, help fade brown spots and improve uneven skin tone from sun damage. Overall, peels enhance the surface of the skin, allowing it to look brighter and younger. Having regular peels every 6-8 weeks will lead to collagen stimulation, healthy skin cell turnover and improve the appearance of wrinkles. Cooper Spa’s Glycolic Peel by SkinCeuticals will complement any Cooper Spa facial and can accommodate all skin types.

Is it preventive? Yes. Removing dead skin cells from the surface of the skin can help the skin continue renewing itself regularly, thus keeping its barrier function strong. A strong barrier function helps to defend against environmental stressors. Daily use of sunscreen is a must when using chemical exfoliators. As we know, the UV rays from the sun can cause premature aging and skin cancer.

How often should you do a chemical peel? A six-week series of glycolic peels is ideal to reach desired results with regular at-home maintenance as recommended by your Cooper Spa Dallas esthetician. Medical grade chemical peels are available at Cooper Clinic Dermatology, where one of our four board certified dermatologists will customize a treatment plan.  A medium-depth chemical peel is often recommended to improve overall texture and skin glow, in addition to treating pre-cancers and reversing photo damage. A chemical peel is a popular revitalizing treatment to regain a fresher, healthier and younger-looking complexion.

For daily skincare, follow these simple steps:

  • Cleanse – Clean skin daily twice daily (morning and night) to keep skin clear and remove debris, oil and makeup.
  • Exfoliate – Use a scrub or daily at-home peel to remove dead skin cells for healthy skin cell turnover. Over the counter exfoliators are not as strong as those given in the professional setting but are needed for maintenance.
  • Tone – Restore the pH balance of skin and remove residue from cleanser.
  • Moisturize (sunscreen) – Keep skin moist and always, always use SPF during the day! It’s a good idea to find a combination moisturizer with sunscreen of at least 30 SPF.

Visit Cooper Spa Dallas to learn more about skincare and what is best for you. Book an appointment with an esthetician for a consultation, facial and an introduction to our recommended product lines: SkinCeuticals, Dermalogica and Éminence Organic Skin Care.

Skin Cancer Screening at Cooper Clinic

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. and the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) reports that one in five adults will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their lifetime. That should be powerful enough to have an annual screening and that’s why it’s is a vital component to the Cooper Clinic Comprehensive Exam. Read about the first four (of six) components to get caught up!

  1. Medical Exam & Counseling
  2. Laboratory Analysis
  3. Cardiovascular Screening
  4. Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) Scan
  5. Skin Cancer Screening
  6. Nutrition Consultation

While beauty is more than skin deep, we must not neglect our skin—the body’s largest organ. Our skin provides an important barrier and immune protection plus hydration and vitamin-producing functions. A skin cancer screening identifies potential problems before they affect your health. Our board-certified dermatologists perform a meticulous screening for cancers, pre-cancers and atypical moles. With the physician you will also discuss information regarding your past sun exposure, sun protection measures and family history of skin cancer.

Types of Skin Cancer

There are many different types of skin cancer: actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Basal cell and squamous cell are the most common forms of skin cancer and if caught early and treated successfully, the cure rate is about 95 percent.

Melanoma is the most deadly skin cancer. According to the CDC, in 2010, 61,061 people were diagnosed with melanomas of the skin and 9,154 people died from it.

You are at higher risk for developing melanoma if you have been a frequent user of tanning beds, have a family history of melanoma, have atypical moles or lots of typical moles.

When melanoma is detected before it spreads, it also has a high cure rate. As is the case with most cancers, patients who have melanoma detected at an earlier stage have improved survival.

Melanomas can occur anywhere on the skin surface but are frequently located on the back and other areas that may be easy to miss with self-inspection. Screening examination of the total skin surface can increase the likelihood of detecting melanoma six-fold compared with partial examination. That is why a head to toe (and between the toes!) examination is very important. Did you know that melanoma can develop in the eye? When purchasing sunglasses, look for ones that block out 99 to 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B radiation.

Symptoms of Melanoma
The most important warning sign for melanoma is a new spot on the skin or a spot that is changing in size, shape or color. The ABCDE rule is a guide for self-examination. Between your annual exams, be aware of the symptoms and contact your physician if you find a spot with any of the following features:

A is for Asymmetry: One half of a mole or birthmark does not match the other.

B is for Border: The edges are irregular, ragged, notched, or blurred.

C is for Color: The color is not the same all over and may include shades of brown or black, or sometimes with patches of pink, red, white, or blue.

D is for Diameter: The spot is larger than 6 millimeters across (about ¼ inch – the size of a pencil eraser), although melanomas can sometimes be smaller than this.

E is for Evolving: The mole is changing in size, shape, or color.

The AAD recommends that persons at highest risk perform frequent self-examination and seek professional evaluation of the skin at least once per year. Cooper Clinic board-certified dermatologists Dr. Rick Wilson, Dr. Flora Kim and Dr. Helen Kaporis can help you protect the health of your skin with preventive dermatology services.

To learn more about a preventive exam at Cooper Clinic, click here or call 866.906.2667 (COOP). Stay tuned for the last component of the exam, nutrition consultation.

Sunscreen Guide 2014

April 18, 2014 1 comment

Skin cancer is caused primarily by unprotected exposure to the sun, meaning it’s often preventable with sunscreen and clothing which protect the skin from too much exposure to the sun. Although sunscreen is readily available, skin cancer rates continue to climb. Why?

Until recently, there were no real standards for how sunscreen manufacturers labeled their products. Experts are hopeful that new labeling guidelines by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will help reduce the incidents of skin cancer in the U.S.

Cooper Clinic Preventive and Cosmetic Dermatologist Flora Kim, MD, FAAD, explains the new FDA guidelines and how to properly use sunscreen to reduce risk of skin cancer.

New FDA Guidelines

New FDA guidelines are intended to make it easier for consumers to know how much protection a particular sunscreen does or does not provide. The use of the label “broad spectrum protection” means the sunscreen has been proven to protect against both UVA and UVB rays (although UVA protection might me weaker than UVB protection). In the past, a sunscreen could be labeled as “broad spectrum” even if it only protected against UVB rays.

When it comes to SPF, any sunscreen lower than SPF 15 must be clearly labeled that it will not protect against skin cancer, but will only prevent sunburn. Sunscreen with an SPF over 15 that is labeled as “broad spectrum” can be labeled as preventing sunburn, skin cancer and aging due to the sun.

Any sunscreen over SPF 50 will now be labeled as SPF 50+, as there is speculation that an SPF higher than 50 is not actually more effective. Additionally, people may be more likely to apply sunscreen with an SPF over 50 less frequently because they think it provides more protection, when in fact, it does not.

Manufacturers are no longer allowed to use words like “waterproof,” “sweatproof” or “sunblock” as these terms are misleading. What you might on sunscreen labels instead is “water-resistant” with a time limit of 40 or 80 minutes before the sunscreen becomes ineffective.

It is important to know that these new FDA guidelines are still in the process of becoming completely enforced, as it takes time for manufacturers to submit required documentation to change labeling. It is always important to read the label of any sunscreen product you are considering.

Recommendations for Sunscreen Use

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends wearing an SPF of 30 or higher every day, not only when you are lying out by the pool or on the beach. The sun’s rays can still be damaging, even on a cloudy day.

Most people do not put on enough sunscreen. In fact, according to the AAD, most people only apply about 25 to 50 percent of what they should put on to be fully protected. As a general guideline, you should generously apply one ounce to all areas of the skin that will be exposed to the sun.

Sunscreen should be applied to dry skin 15 minutes before you go outside and reapplied every two hours, or after swimming or heavy sweating.

For more guidelines from the American Academy of Dermatology, click here.

What About Makeup and Moisturizers?

Some cosmetic products and moisturizers do contain a small amount of SPF, but if you are trying to protect yourself from sun damage or skin cancer that will not be sufficient protection. Dr. Kim recommends an application of dedicated sunscreen underneath your moisturizer and makeup rather than relying on the SPF of your cosmetic products.

Ultimately, you must remember that no sunscreen is perfect. Wearing long sleeves and a hat and staying in the shade as much as possible are also important precautions to take to prevent sun damage or potentially deadly skin cancer.

For more information about cosmetic and preventive dermatology at Cooper Clinic, click here or call 972.367.6000.

How to Protect Your Skin, Sunscreen and Beyond

December 2, 2013 1 comment

In honor of American Academy of Dermatology’s (AAD) National Healthy Skin Month in November, Flora S. Kim, MD, FAAD, Preventive and Cosmetic Dermatologist at Cooper Clinic shares how to maintain healthy skin. Most people know that the AAD recommends a daily use of SPF 30, but what else can we do protect our skin from the harmful UV rays of the sun?

Dr. Kim recommends using an antioxidant serum. This is an extra step that you can easily add to your morning regime to give your skin extra protection. “Sunscreens are a great first line of defense, but they are imperfect—UV rays are going to get to your skin,” Dr. Kim said.

Sunscreens block the UV rays, while the antioxidant serum neutralizes the free radicals that are formed to add another level of protection. Like Dr. Kim said, the serum is a great second line of defense, but not a replacement for sunscreen. Even in the winter it is important to protect your skin.

Which serums do you recommend? Every product is different for every skin type. What works for your best friend, will not necessarily work for you. Cooper Clinic Dermatology recommends SkinCeuticals® products and the NEOCUTIS RéACTIVE Anti-oxidant Serum. Depending on the serum, Dr. Kim recommends you wash your face, apply the serum, apply a daily moisturizer, sunscreen and then makeup (if you wear it).

As an analogy Dr. Kim compared our skin to a banana. “It’s oxygen that makes us age. It’s like opening a banana—at first it’s white and pure and over time it starts to form dark spots. In essence, that’s what’s happening to our skin over decades. UV rays trigger the aging process.”

What if I use a moisturizer or makeup with SPF?

Moisturizer with SPF is better than not using any at all, but if you have the time it’s better to wear a dedicated sunscreen. The SPF is diluted in the moisturizer. Even if it is an SPF 30, you probably won’t actually receive SPF 30 because you aren’t putting enough on.

The most important thing with sunscreens is to reapply—after two hours it’s probably already gone. Sunscreen is wiped off, sweated off and isn’t always applied evenly.

Realistically, women are not going to reapply their sunscreen lotion over their makeup throughout the day. It’s not feasible to take off make up, apply sunscreen and reapply make up.

For extra protection use a sunscreen powder. Colorescience® and Jane Iredale® sell make up with sunscreen or loose powder (color or sheer) with SPF 30, which is approved by Skin Cancer Foundation. The powder is very easy to reapply and will not mess up your makeup.  

What are other alternatives?

If you don’t want to use the traditional lotion sunscreen, there are many other options. It also comes in foams, gels, sprays, and powders. Did you know clothes are a form of SPF? There are now laundry detergents you can add to your washing machine to add extra protection to your clothes.

Invest in your health. It’s so much easier to prevent aging—once you have the wrinkles and the dark brown spots, we have techniques to help. Add a serum of a loose powder to your daily routine to give your skin a second line of defense.

For more information about Cosmetic and Preventive Dermatology at Cooper Clinic call 972.367.6000 or request an appointment.