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Posts Tagged ‘Cooper Complete nutritional supplements’

NEW Vitamin D-3 Drops and Vitamin D-3 Softgels

October 22, 2014 Leave a comment
Cooper Complete Vitamin D-3 Softgels

Cooper Complete Vitamin D-3 Softgels

This Fall Cooper Complete® Nutritional Supplements has given our Vitamin D consumers an extra dose of attention. Cooper Complete Vitamin D-3, our vitamin supplement, has changed forms from an orange colored tablet to a softgel. If you’ve been taking Vitamin D-3 in tablet form, the item number (and SKU) remain the same.

Why the change? The softgel allows us to provide the same 1,000 IU Vitamin D-3 in a form that has fewer “other ingredients” which provides a more pure supplement.

We’ve also added a new product, Cooper Complete Vitamin D-3 Drops. Why another Vitamin D from Cooper Complete? The team of physicians at Cooper Clinic made this recommendation. If you’ve been to Cooper Clinic any time since 2008, you know that vitamin D testing is part of the laboratory analysis. Because food forms of vitamin D are pretty limited and prescribing prolonged sun exposure can be problematic for most folks, individuals with vitamin D levels that are less than optimal (anything less than 30 ng/mL) get supplements.

Unlike a prescription Z-Pak (Zithromax) where one-size-fits-all, this is not the case for Vitamin D—the amount I need compared to what you need may be wildly different. For some, the 2,000 IU Vitamin D that’s in each of the Cooper Complete Multivitamin is plenty, for others, an extra 1,000 IU Vitamin D does the trick. And then there are the rest of us—who may need an additional, 2,000-5,000 or more per day! So, enter Vitamin D-3 Drops, a multi-size solution.

Cooper Complete Vitamin D-3 Drops

Cooper Complete Vitamin D-3 Drops

The Vitamin D-3 Drops bottle looks like an over-sized bottle of dry eye moisturizer. Unlike dye eye “tears” that are very runny, the D-3 Drops are a thick emulsion and it requires a bit of pressure and squeeze of the bottle to get a single drop dispensed. Each drop is 1,000 IU of Vitamin D-3, so depending upon how much vitamin D-3 your doctor has prescribed; you simply squeeze out the required number of drops. The bottle contains a whopping 750 droplets.

Vitamin D-3 Drops are perfect for:

  • Those who dislike or have difficulty swallowing pills
  • Those who need significant levels of vitamin D

This product is not ideal for:

  • Those who have manual dexterity or weak motor skills
  • Those who like to have their prescriptions and supplements organized in pill containers (as there is nowhere to put the bottle)

The official dosing instructions for Cooper Complete Vitamin D-3 Drops are to squeeze as many drops as needed directly onto the tongue. The drops are not completely flavorless, but the flavor is honestly not off-putting. Because vitamin D is fat-soluble, for optimal absorption, you should take this (and all multivitamin and mineral supplements) with a meal that contains some fat. If squeezing drops onto the tongue is difficult or off-putting, we offer these alternatives:

  • Dispense on top of a cracker or Saltine.
  • Dispense on top of a spoonful of yogurt, applesauce, or other cool or room temperature food
  • Do not add to water—vitamin D is fat-soluble and will sink to the bottom of the cup where it will stay.
  • Do not add to coffee or other hot beverages—vitamin D will dissolve and will also be lost in the process.

The shelf life of Vitamin D-3 Drops is one year and our existing supply is good through July, 2015.

Whether you choose to take Vitamin D-3 Softgels or Vitamin D-3 Drops, both forms are equally absorbed in the body. Visit coopercomplete.com to purchase or call 888.393.2221 today.

See-Food, Supplementation and Exercises for Your Eye Health

January 16, 2014 Leave a comment

Have you been spending a lot of ‘screen time’ with a new gadget from Christmas? The average American adult spends an average of 9.5 hours every day in front of a screen. Do you think that sounds too high? It adds up. Between a computer screen at work, watching the news at home, playing Candy Crush on an iPhone, browsing Pinterest on your iPad. Cooper Clinic Dietitian Meridan Zerner explained recently on Fox 4 Good Day that all of those devices (and anything with a screen) emit a blue light which is problematic for the retina. Yes, we can be more aware about our ‘screen time’, but what else can we do? Meridan gave suggestions for diet, supplementation and even eye exercises. Check it out below.

Diet

Try a “see-food” diet. Ha! Really, though—eat salmon, sardines or tuna two to three times a week to receive omega-3—this acts as an anti-inflammatory.

Meridan said to literally eat your garnish. Kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collard greens and baby spinach should be in your daily diet. These veggies are not only for good health, but also for your eye health. They contain lutein and zeaxanthin, which are actually in your eyes. When I think of eating healthy for my eyes, I think of carrots. But I learned lutein and zeaxanthin have been proven to be much more effective than beta-carotene, which is found in carrots and other orange vegetables.

Supplementation

Do you really need supplements? Meridan said this is when to take a reality check. Are you going to eat perfectly every day? Are you really going to have fish two to three times a week and five to nine servings of vegetables a day? New Year’s is a great time to make healthy changes, but if the answer is no, then that’s where supplements come into play. Cooper Complete®’s newest product, MVP (Maximum Vision Performance), is a great supplement to support eye health. It includes vitamin D, omega-3, lutein and zeaxanthin. Learn more about it here.

Eye Workouts

Yes, these really help. Meridan said eye works are beneficial, especially for those of us who have a lot of screen time!

  • Do an exaggerated eye roll and blink definitively. Do it in the other direct and repeat for five reps. This exercise will stretch your eye muscles.
  • She also suggested using the 20-20-20 Rule. Every 20 minutes look away from your screen, look 20 feet away and focus for 20 seconds.

Also evaluate the distance you sit from a computer screen. Studies show that you should be at least an arm’s length away from a computer screen. Take frequent breaks for your mind, body and eyes.

For more information about Cooper Complete nutritional supplements, visit coopercomplete.com.

Vitamin K Supplements

March 13, 2013 2 comments
Jill Turner

Jill Turner

We had a question this morning about Vitamin K supplements. The writer asked for information on vitamin K-2 (supplementation from MK-7), along with calcium and vitamin D for bone health, and wanted to know about the form of vitamin K used in Cooper Complete Original multivitamin and mineral formulations.

Vitamin K is an essential nutrient the liver uses to form proteins that promote blood clotting (and prevent abnormal bleeding). There are three basic forms of vitamin K:

  • Vitamin K1 (which includes phytonadione, the form in our multivitamin) is a natural nutrient found in green leafy vegetables, and in smaller amounts, some oils (oil, soybean and canola).
  • Vitamin K2 (menaquinones or MKs) include MK4 which is found in meats and dairy products. MK7 is found in some fermented foods, like cheese. This form of K is also found in a Japanese soy product called “natto”. (There’s a website where you can purchase “nattomoto powder” to use with soybeans to make natto. Some say it smells strong, pungent and cheesy, and others say it doesn’t have a lot of smell.)
  • Vitamin K3 (menadione) is a man-made form of vitamin K. This form isn’t sold as a supplement for humans, ut is sometimes used in feed for life stock.

Healthy adults eating plenty of leafy green vegetables typically get all the vitamin K they need through their diet. Food provides the body with about half the normal supply of the vitamin needed, and intestinal bacteria produces the rest.

A deficiency can occur in individuals who are on antibiotics for extended periods, have liver damage, or intestinal disorders such as celiac disease. Alcoholism can also contribute to a vitamin K deficiency.

In humans, vitamin K supplements may increase bone mineral density and bone strength. The majority of studies have been conducted on patients in Japan using the menatetrenone form (vitamin K2) of vitamin K as fermented soybeans (Natto) are part of breakfast for many Japanese. Epidemiological studies suggest that decreased vitamin K intake is associated with increased risk of hip fracture, but not decreased bone density, although the association between low intakes of vitamin K and decreased bone density was seen in women in some studies. More research is needed on the potential impact of vitamin K on bone health. We also need research on the subject in the US – with the Japanese studies we don’t know what other foods or lifestyle habits might be different than those of the typical American and yet affect the outcome of the studies.

With its role in blood clotting, consumption of vitamin K is a major issue for individuals on Warfarin (blood thinners), and has to be closely watched as increases in vitamin K make warfarin less effective. For this reason, the Basic One multivitamin and mineral formulations do not contain vitamin K.

It appears that consumption of vitamin K2 (through food or supplementation) can last days longer than vitamin K1, the form found in plants and plant-based supplements, so keep this in mind if you decide to add vitamin K2 to your diet or supplement regimen.