Archive

Posts Tagged ‘fitness’

2016 Cooper Fitness Center Member Awards

Each year, Cooper Fitness Center recognizes members who exemplify the Get Cooperized model and represent Cooper Fitness Center in the best ways possible. This year, we had an incredible pool of nominees as Cooper ambassadors, which made it challenging to select just a few. Congratulations to all of the recipients!

Mr. & Mrs. Aerobics: Scott & Michele Kline, Members Since 2008

scott-klineScott and Michele Kline are dedicated to living an active and healthy lifestyle and are quick to encourage and support each other. The couple actively participates in fitness adherence programs and Activ8 member wellness program activities, and they exemplify “a couple that sweats together, stays together.” Michele trains weekly with Chris Parker and also works with Boxing Pro Derrick James. Scott ran the Boston Marathon when he was 25. When he turned 50 he ran his second marathon. In the past three years, he has run 10 more marathons and has completed more than 40 half marathons. They lead by example and are healthy role models for their children. Scott and Michele have enrolled their son, Andrew, in Cooper’s youth programs since he was a small child, and as a teen he is still involved in basketball and other sports programs. They are committed to demonstrating that being active should be a fun part of daily life. The family lights up Cooper with their smiles, and they’re always up for a challenge together.

Female of the Year: Beth Bond Thomas, Member Since 2012

beth-thomasBeth Bond Thomas has a passion for community and fitness. Beth is an avid tennis player, marathon runner and cyclist, and trains with Christian Mazur. She ran the 2016 New York City Marathon as a member of the Race to Cure MS team and raised more than $7,000. She also chaired the 2016 Girls, Inc. Inspirational Open Tennis Tournament in Dallas, which raised more than $31,000. Beth is an incredible role model for her family and fellow Cooper Fitness Center members. It must run in the family—Beth receives the Female of the Year award a few decades after her father, Bill Bond, won the award for Male of the Year.

Male of the Year: E.N. Simon, Member Since 2013

en-simonE.N. Simon is fully committed to getting healthier through fitness, even as he faces a health condition that would make many others give up. He has changed his life through his dedication to exercise. During the past year, he’s improved from sedentary to fit, and has lost 80 pounds in the process. E.N. credits much of his success to his training at Cooper Fitness Center, and his fellow members have noticed the positive changes. E.N. embodies a Cooperized lifestyle and is the ideal Male of the Year.

Classic of the Year: Fred Hoster, Member Since 1973

fred-hosterFred Hoster embodies what it means to Get Cooperized—other members might even consider him to be the “Mayor” of Cooper Fitness Center thanks to his dedication and leadership. Fred is at Cooper Fitness Center every day, helps lead the Classics programming and encourages his fellow Classics to take control of their health. He lives healthfully by giving back to others, sharing his wisdom as a mentor and friend and embracing each day as a gift. Fred is an example of aging gracefully and is a role model for others to do so as well.

Youth of the Year: Jake Serota, CFC Client Since May 2016

jake-serotaAt the age of 10, Jake Serota has already conquered many challenges. He was diagnosed with a condition at age three, which affected his overall health. With the support of his family, Jake is overcoming his health obstacles daily by focusing on eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly. Since Jake started training with Shannon Edwards in May 2016, he has lost 25 pounds. Jake also enjoys swimming laps, practicing Brazilian Jiu Jit Su and has joined his school’s running club. Jake is proud of himself and is dedicated to learning and practicing healthy habits throughout his life.

Most Improved: Alan Tallis, Member Since 2004

alan-tallisAlan Tallis has embraced focusing on his health after retirement. After years of travel and late work nights, Alan decided it was time to take care of himself. Even after facing a few health setbacks, Alan has devoted himself to six days a week of aerobic exercise and at least three days a week of functional strength training with Shannon Edwards. He also participates in weekly Pilates sessions with Mary Ellen Elkhay. On top of his dedication to fitness, Alan takes time to give back at Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center and The Salvation Army. Alan demonstrates no matter your age or circumstance, you can thrive when you focus on health, fitness and wellness.

Activ8 Champion: Maureen Corcoran, Member Since 2013

mauren-corcoranMaureen Corcoran has a noticeable passion for her health and wellness and lives out Dr. Cooper’s “8 Steps to Get Cooperized” daily. After joining Female Focus four years ago, Maureen became a Cooper Fitness Center member and quickly plugged into various activities, including the Activ8 member wellness program. She is constantly working to improve her Activ8 Score and has seen positive results as the year has passed. Maureen finds joy in learning about her health and embraces Activ8 because of this dedication. Maureen is a role model by the way she lives and interacts with others. Her energy and joy are contagious and her healthy lifestyle is a great example to others.

We are extremely proud of the hard work our members put in to living healthy and active lifestyles, and this year’s award recipients fully embody what it means to Get Cooperized. See the video and photos from the ceremony on the Cooper Fitness Center Facebook page. For more information about Cooper Fitness Center membership, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com/members.

Self-Defense as Prevention for All Ages

Prevention isn’t just about taking care of your health and fitness. It’s also about being aware of your surroundings and keeping yourself safe from harm. When it comes to facing bullies and defending against the elements, self-defense is the number one form of prevention. Cooper Fitness Center Martial Arts Pro Mike Proctor explains the importance of learning self-defense at any age.

Mental and Physical Aspects of Self-Defense

Mike notes that most self-defense is mental and emotional, and includes having a plan and being aware of your surroundings at all times. You should have a plan for everything–a house fire, car breakdown on the highway or just walking to your car from the shopping mall. “I tell my students that martial arts are 90 percent mental and emotional, and 10 percent physical,” says Mike.

According to Mike, the physical techniques of self-defense are relatively simple compared to preparing mentally. “We are taught to never make a scene and to not hurt people,” explains Mike. “That makes it hard to go against your instincts when you’re put in a tough situation where self-defense is needed.” Mentally, it’s key to know when you are the most vulnerable; physically, you must know how to defend yourself against various situations.

Who Needs Self-Defense?

Self-defense can and should be practiced by all ages, both male and female. The self-defense course you take should aim at your particular demographic and your physical abilities. Though self-defense is important for everyone, Mike points out the following populations who could benefit most from learning self-defense:

  • Adults and children with special needs: those with special needs, including hearing loss, vision impairment, Down syndrome, Multiple Sclerosis and others, are more likely to be victims of bullying or physical harm because they are more vulnerable targets.
  • College students: college-age young adults, especially females, are at the most vulnerable time of their lives. Being on campus can create a feeling of security, but this is often an illusion.
  • Females of all ages: Mike notes that situations calling for self-defense most often occur to women, no matter the age.

Bullying

Bullying isn’t just something that happens on the schoolyard anymore, and kids aren’t the only victims. Bullying can occur within romantic relationships, between coworkers, online and in various other situations. “When it comes to bullying, it’s important to focus on your attitude and action–what your response will be,” says Mike. As a society, we have a responsibility to recognize bullying (whether it is happening to us or another person) and act to stop it. Learning self-defense can give children and adults the confidence to stand up to a bully should they encounter one and know when to ask for help from others.

How Martial Arts Can Prepare You

Training in martial arts can give you a sense of empowerment that you can do something to protect yourself or others if you are ever put in a situation when it’s needed. Mike recommends treating self-defense courses the same way you would treat CPR certification–take a course about every two years to stay up-to-date and to practice your skills. The skills should become reflexes in order to be most effective. “Taking courses every two years can remind you that danger can occur at any time,” explains Mike. “You can fall into a false sense of security when you’re not practicing often enough, and self-defense courses are a way to always stay on your toes and be aware of the problems you may face in the world.”

Remember that self-defense isn’t a one-size-fits-all mentality. You must be aware of your own vulnerabilities and understand how to combat them. Keeping yourself safe is of utmost importance, and self-defense is the best preventive tool available.

For more information about martial arts programs at Cooper Fitness Center, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com/ProZone.

Sit Less, Move More – Exercise Guidelines for Diabetes and Prediabetes

November 14, 2016 Leave a comment

By Elana Paddock, RDN, LD, CDE, Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services

Many people with diabetes do not exercise despite all of its proven benefits. If you have diabetes or prediabetes, physical activity is more than just a way to lose weight – it can also make it easier to keep your blood glucose (sugar) levels closer to normal.

When you have diabetes, your body’s insulin action is less effective in storing glucose and regulating your blood sugars, but exercise sensitizes insulin. During exercise, stored glucose becomes a source of energy for your muscles and as the stores gets depleted, your blood sugar goes down and can stay down for 24-48 hours.

What types and amounts of physical activity are recommended for diabetes?

  • Aerobic exercise includes brisk walking, bicycling, swimming, aerobics, elliptical, dancing, rowing, tennis and stair climbing. Engage in at least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity weekly, spread over at least three days per week, with no more than two consecutive days without activity.
  • Resistance training includes exercises with weight machines, free weights, elastic resistance bands, body weight and group strength training classes. Perform these at least two times a week on non-consecutive days.
  • Balance and flexibility training includes yoga and tai chi. Aim for two or three times a week.
  • Light-intensity activities daily (read below under “updates”).

To better fit your schedule, you can break up 30 minutes into 10- or 15-minute segments several times a day. Research has shown the health benefits are similar. Recent studies have also shown that a 15-minute walk after meals can help lower your blood sugar.

What are the updates in the latest exercise guidelines?

People with diabetes are advised to incorporate “light” activities throughout the day, particularly when sedentary for prolonged periods of time (working on the computer, sitting in a meeting or watching TV). Take a light activity break for three minutes for every 30 minutes of sitting. Examples include:

  • Overhead arm stretches
  • Leg extensions
  • Torso twists
  • Walking in place

Exercise Tips:

  • Have a very specific plan. Define what, when, where and for how long you’re going to commit to working out. This will improve your chances of adherence and success.
  • What kind of exercises will you do? Make a list of activities and be creative. If you enjoy what you’re doing, you’re more likely to stick with it!
  • When are you going to fit in a workout? Make a schedule of the specific days and times you will exercise. Prioritize them on your calendar as “appointments.”
  • Are you going to exercise at a gym, in a group class, at a park or track or at home using a workout DVD or technology app? Decide what might work best for you.
  • Do you prefer to exercise solo, with a buddy, in a class or with a personal trainer? Participating in supervised training may provide more health benefits for people with diabetes than non-supervised programs. Plus, the accountability to others can be very motivating.
  • How long will you exercise? Be realistic and set achievable goals. If you are brand new to working out, start with 10 minutes and build up to 30 minutes or more.
  • Keep a log of your exercise to stay on track. You can use fitness technology resources like a pedometer, fitness band or exercise watch to track steps, calories and heart rate. Don’t forget to give yourself credit for what you do-every step counts!

When you have diabetes, prioritize exercise as part of your lifestyle to better control your blood sugars. Beyond managing your diabetes, exercise can help you feel better about yourself and improve your overall health.

For more information about preventing and managing diabetes and prediabetes, visit the Cooper Aerobics website.

Cooper Connections at the 2016 Summer Olympic Games

The closing ceremony of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games is finally upon us, following countless displays of athleticism and sportsmanship these past two weeks.  The United States leads the final medal count, with American athletes earning 121 total medals – 46 gold, 37 silver and 38 bronze. We take a look back now at some fun facts and Cooper connections to the celebrated Olympic Games through the years.

  • Did you know Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper was selected to participate in the Olympic torch relay through Arlington, Texas, for the 1996 Summer Olympic Games held in Atlanta, Georgia? Prior to every Olympic Games, the Olympic flame is transported with the Olympic torch from Greece to the designated host city via the Olympic torch relay.DrCooperOlympicsTorchRelay
  • This year was the first time that Brazil served as host for the Olympic Games. Dr. Kenneth Cooper has visited Brazil many times and first traveled to Brazil to train the Brazilian national soccer team with Coach Cláudio Coutinho in 1970. That year the Brazilian national team went on to win the World Cup, and because of Dr. Cooper’s introduction of aerobic exercising to Brazil, in Brazil they refer to “jogging” as “Coopering” or “doing your Cooper.”
  • The five Olympic Rings symbolize the five regions of the world: Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe and the Americas. At least one of the colors of the Olympic rings – blue, yellow, black, green and red – appears in every flag in the world. Dr. Cooper’s message has reached almost every corner of these regions; his 19 books have been sold in 52 countries and translated into 40 languages. The most recent book, Start Strong, Finish Strong, was co-authored with his son, Tyler Cooper, MD, MPH, President and CEO of Cooper Aerobics.
  • Of the 28 sports in the Summer Olympics, Cooper Fitness Center Sports Pros offer training in five of these sports – aquatics, basketball, boxing, martial arts and tennis. You may not be an Olympian, but you can certainly train like one at Cooper.
  • The Olympic motto is “Citius, Altius, Fortius.” When translated from Latin to English it means “Faster, Higher, Stronger.” Most athletes make use of the top five aerobic exercises – cross-country skiing, swimming, running/jogging, outdoor cycling and walking – in their training to help them build endurance for optimal performance. Training with one of our 28 professional fitness trainers at Cooper Fitness Center can help you become faster, higher and stronger.
  • There is no limit to the number of athletes a team can bring to the Olympics; nations can bring any and every athlete that qualifies. Did you know Cooper Fitness Center Boxing Pro Derrick James accompanied boxer Errol Spence, Jr. to the London 2012 Summer Olympics? 

     

    Fitness has been the foundation of Dr. Cooper’s teachings since 1968 when he coined the term “aerobics” and sparked an international fitness revolution. We hope you’ll learn more about Cooper Aerobics and Dr. Cooper’s 8 Steps to Get Cooperized as the sun sets on the Olympic Games in Rio and the countdown begins for the next Olympic Games – 547 days and counting until PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympics, followed by Tokyo 2020 for the next Summer Olympic Games.

What Cooper Fitness Center Sports Pros Love About the Olympics

Every four years, the Olympic Games provide an opportunity to watch the best athletes in the world compete against each other and showcase their incredible skills. Cheering your country on to victory brings about a sense of patriotism and appreciation for physical fitness that is unmatched.

Cooper Fitness Center Sports Pros are no exception–they love the summer and winter Olympics alike, and each of them has special memories of specific games. Learn more about our Pros’ favorite Olympic moments below, and make sure to comment and share your favorite Olympic sports and what you’re most looking forward to seeing take place in Rio this year.

What is your favorite Olympic sport to watch?

Who is your all-time favorite Olympic athlete?

  • Mike: Rafer Johnson (Track & Field)
  • Marni: Michael Johnson (Track & Field) – I got to see him set records at Baylor in the late 1980s.
  • Corey: Venus Williams (Tennis)
  • Coleman: Jessie Owens (Track & Field)
  • Derrick: Muhammad Ali (Boxing)

If you could compete in an Olympic sport, which one would it be?

  • Mike: Fencing
  • Marni: Cross country skiing (Biathlon)
  • Corey: Well, besides tennis…swimming.
  • Coleman: Basketball
  • Derrick: Boxing

Do you have a favorite Olympic memory?

  • Mike: I attended the 1960 Olympics in Rome, where I had the opportunity to meet Rafer Johnson.
  • Marni: When Muhammad Ali lit the torch at the 1996 games in Atlanta!
  • Corey: 1992 Dream Team. Michael Jordan and those guys were incredible.
  • Coleman: 1992 Dream Team. It was the first time all professionals from the United States participated in Olympic basketball.
  • Derrick: I went to the 2012 Olympics in London, where one of the boxers I train was competing.

What do you like most about the Olympics?

  • Mike: The overall patriotism and positive attitude of athletes and spectators.
  • Marni: I love the fact that amateur athletes who have worked so hard have the opportunity to come together to compete, and it’s their chance to perform their best. It’s their time to shine!
  • Corey: I like all the patriotism. It’s nice to see the country come together and work together toward a common goal.
  • Coleman: The Olympic Games are an opportunity for all countries to compete on a level playing field. The games give athletes a chance to compete against other talented athletes from all over the world, who they may not face in other competitions.
  • Derrick: The Olympics are in the name of sports and friendship. It’s the greatest event in the world.

For more information about Cooper Fitness Center’s Sports Pros and sport-specific training, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com/ProZone.

 

Conquering the Summer Camp Swim Test

Sneakers? Sunscreen? Sleeping bag? All may be necessary items for summer camp, but children should also be armed with top-notch swim skills. Cooper Fitness Center Swim Pro Marni Kerner helps kids of all ages prepare for swim tests that are often required at summer day camps and overnight camps.

Each test varies in length and intensity. Some require a child to swim the length or width of a pool, but others require performing all four competitive strokes–freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke and butterfly–in open water situations. If a child is unable to pass the designated swim test, he or she may have limited access to water activities throughout the duration of the camp, or may be required to wear a life jacket when swimming in a pool or open water.

Training with a certified swim instructor prior to taking a swim test has numerous benefits:

  • Sharpens the child’s skills early in the summer, since it has likely been a while since the child has swam longer distances
  • Introduces specific stroke training to those who may not be familiar with all four competitive strokes
  • Increases physical strength and endurance
  • Improves stroke techniques
  • Builds confidence in the swimmer

In addition to working on swim skills, each swimmer also learns water safety and rest strokes, including how to bob and tread water in order to conserve energy.

Children may only need one lesson to refresh their swim skills, but others may take up to five or six lessons to prepare for their specific test. The time and effort invested is worth it so the kids can enjoy an exciting and safe summer in the water.

For more information about Cooper Fitness Center swim programs, visit cooperswimacademy.com or call Swim Pro Marni Kerner at 972.233.4832, ext. 5447.

10 Reasons Why Female Focus Benefits Women’s Health

Female Focus 10 years

Since 2006, hundreds of women each year have participated in more than 3,000 Female Focus classes, a science-based small group training program designed to help women exercise to gain strength as they manage diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, fibromyalgia, heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

The women who have participated in Female Focus throughout the past 10 years listed the top 10 reasons why the program has benefitted both their physical and mental health:

  1. A sense of accountability to health and fitness and provides motivation to work harder both in and outside of class
  2. Camaraderie and support of women going through similar challenges and life experiences
  3. Personal attention from Colette Cole, the director of the program, and other trainers – staff expertise and experience is unmatched
  4. Improved overall strength, posture, balance, mobility, endurance, functional movement and daily activity movement
  5. Weight loss and maintenance
  6. Enjoyment from a variety of fun workouts
  7. Reduction of injury risk and attention to detail regarding training for specific injuries
  8. Sessions are personalized for both exercise and nutrition
  9. Focus on specific women’s health issues, including improvement of bone density
  10. Stress reduction

The program is based on materials and research from Women’s Health and Fitness Guide written by Michele Kettles, MD, MSPH, Chief Medical Officer of Cooper Clinic, and Colette Cole, MS, Cooper Fitness Center Female Focus Director and Professional Fitness Trainer. Under Colette’s guidance, participants learn how to overcome physical and mental challenges that are often a side effect of health issues.

In addition to learning and growing stronger physically, many of the women are drawn to the program because of the bonds they form with each other. Many are going through similar life changes, such as kids going off to college or becoming caretakers of aging parents. They also face similar challenges and are working toward similar goals – to be healthier and happier.

Dr. Jill Ombrello has participated in Female Focus for the past three years. She joined the program because she wanted the accountability of a scheduled and customized workout. However, she had no idea how many additional benefits she would receive as a result.

“Not only did I gain accountability, but I also joined a community of women looking to improve their health in the same ways as me. We are not equally strong or flexible, but Collette creates a different, unique and interesting workout for us every time we attend. In a society where many women are often competing with one another, Colette has created a unique environment where we all feel supported and pushed to achieve greatness.”

For more information about the Female Focus program, visit cooperfitfemale.com.