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Posts Tagged ‘Heart Disease’

Millie Cooper Honored by American Heart Association

February 9, 2016 2 comments

Every 34 seconds, someone in the United States has a heart attack. Every 60 seconds, someone in the United States dies from a heart disease-related event. Cardiovascular diseases claim more lives than all forms of cancer combined.  According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the number one killer of women, causing one in three deaths each year. That’s approximately one woman every minute! Additionally, 90 percent of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease.

Millie Cooper, known as the “First Lady of Aerobics,” was recently honored with the Sandi Haddock Impact Award at the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Luncheon in Dallas thanks to her global efforts to promote physical activity and healthy habits.  Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth H. Cooper, are longtime supporters of the American Heart Association and major advocates of living healthy lifestyles to prevent heart disease.

Go Red Luncheon Family Crop

From left to right: Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper, Millie Cooper, T.J. Estes, Berkley Estes, Angie Cooper and Dr. Tyler Cooper

At the February 4 luncheon, close to 1,300 attendees heard from heart attack survivor Elissa Taylor, a Dallas-area mother who in 2015 had a heart attack at age 39. Her message to women is to take care of yourself, slow down, see your doctor and know the warning signs of a heart attack (which are different in women than in men).

Additionally, Lori Greiner of Shark Tank and QVC-TV paralleled business success with living healthy lifestyles. She explained the importance of women taking control of their health, not being afraid to ask questions and working hard to be healthy, safe and there for their loved ones.

Go Red Luncheon Lori

The phrase “Go Red” is a call to action for women to understand the risk of heart disease and stroke and actively work to keep their bodies healthy in order to prevent a cardiac event.  Remember…

G – Get Your Numbers

O – Own Your Lifestyle

R – Raise Your Voice

E – Educate Your Family

D – Donate

To learn more about the Go Red for Women campaign, click here. To see more photos from the event, visit the Cooper Aerobics Facebook page.

Heart Health Boosting Foods

February 17, 2015 Leave a comment

This month we celebrate heart health. There are many powerful foods that deliver big benefits to reduce your risk of heart disease. Here are a few super-stars that you may want to incorporate into your routine. All of these foods are loaded with heart-protective components that will keep your heart strong and pumping.

Salmon
This fatty fish ranks high in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fats may reduce inflammation throughout the body which can cause damage to your blood vessels and lead to heart disease. These healthy fats may also lower cholesterol, blood pressure, reduce blood clotting, decrease stroke and risk for heart failure. Try to eat fatty fish, like salmon, two to three times a week.

Blueberries
These berries are bursting with antioxidants, specifically the phytonutrient polyphenol. Anti-oxidants are potent substances that reduce inflammation in the body and reduce the risk of heart disease, along with other chronic diseases. Add blueberries to yogurt or smoothies. Frozen blueberries are just as nutritionally packed as fresh!

Avocados
Everyone loves avocados! These fruits are packed with mono-unsaturated fat that bumps up your good HDL cholesterol and lowers risk of heart disease. Recent research shows a link between consuming avocados daily and reducing bad LDL cholesterol. Avocados also contain vitamin B 6 and folic acid which are also beneficial to your heart. Enjoy avocados in salads or as a sandwich spread instead of mayo several times a week.

Walnuts
Walnuts contain a wealth of omega-3 fats in the world of nuts. If you’re not a fan of salmon or other fatty fish, this is a great way to fit these fats into your diet. Walnuts also contain vitamin E which is an antioxidant that may protect your heart. Enjoy walnuts on salads or as a crunchy snack. Try to eat nuts at least 3 times a week- 4 or five times is even better!

Oatmeal
Oatmeal is good news for your heart. The type of soluble fiber in oats, beta-glucans, forms a gooey mass in your stomach, trapping cholesterol and transporting it out of the body before it can get absorbed into your blood, thus lowering your LDL cholesterol levels. It takes about 1 ½ cups of cooked oatmeal (equal to ¾ cups dry) to get the maximum benefit. Try to eat oatmeal several times a week. Top with blueberries and walnuts- two other star foods on the list!

For information on nutrition consultations at Cooper Clinic visit cooperclinicnutrition.com or call 972.560.2655.

Join Drs. Cooper in the 2014 Dallas Heart Walk

Since 1970, Cooper Aerobics’ mission has been preventive medicine, saving thousands of lives by identifying early signs of heart disease. Sharing the mission to improve heart health and end cardiovascular disease and stroke, we’re proud to support American Heart Association.

Nearly 20 years ago, Dr. Kenneth Cooper began the first Dallas Heart Walk with only 450 walkers. The Dallas Heart Walk is now the largest in the nation, with more than 60,000 walkers last year. To commemorate the 20th anniversary, Dr. Kenneth Cooper will lead this year’s walk on Sept. 13 as Honorary Chairman with son, Dr. Tyler Cooper as the 2012-2014 Board President of the Dallas Division of the American Heart Association. Watch the video below with Drs. Cooper and other community leaders honoring the anniversary.


In addition to Dr. Tyler Cooper’s role as Board President, he has personally pledged to fundraise $250,000 and has taken on the role as the Inspired Giving Chair of the Executive Cabinet for the Dallas Heart Walk in honor of his dad’s generous contributions over the years. In this role, Dr. Tyler Cooper has encouraged many influential business leaders in the community to personally contribute to the 2014 Dallas Heart Walk to achieve the goal of $5.5 million.

Earlier this summer, Cooper Aerobics teammates (employees) kicked off fundraising efforts with a pep rally. View photos here. We’ve currently fundraised $66,577 and are on our way to reaching our goal of $100,000. Support the Cooper Aerobics Team by making a donation here and join our team to walk with us on Sept. 13.

Donate to the Cooper Aerobics’ Heart Walk Team | Join the Cooper Aerobics’ Heart Walk Team

Cooper Cares About Heart Health

October 17, 2013 Leave a comment

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the Cooper Aerobics Dallas Heart Walk team. We had a great time at Victory Park on Sept. 7! Thus far we have raised over $85,000 to take a stand against heart disease and stroke, the no. 1 and no. 4 killers of Americans. The American Heart Association—Dallas is accepting donations through Dec. 31. As of right now we are listed at #9 on the list of top fundraising teams! Click here to view our progress or make a contribution.

Cooper Aerobics has a long standing history with the American Heart Association and we represent our support with the saying ‘Cooper Cares About Heart Health‘. Over 65 people represented our team with ‘Cooper Cares About Heart Health’ t-shirts for the Heart Walk this year.

We kicked off our fundraising efforts in July and awarded our teammates (employees) with incentives to help us reach our lofty goal! An even bigger incentive to all teammates, was Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper’s pledge to match our fundraising efforts with a contribution to our own non-profit, The Cooper Institute.

While preparing our team for the Dallas Heart Walk, Dr. Tyler Cooper and other teammates who took initiative to be Team Captains helped us remind everyone why we are fundraising and walking to put  The Names Behind the Numbers.

We walked proud in the largest Heart Walk in the nation just as our very own Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper did in the first Dallas Heart Walk in 1992. Click here to see more photos from the 2013 Dallas Heart Walk and our activities leading up to that special day.

The American Heart Association—Dallas‘ goal is to raise $5.5 million and currently has raised over $4.9 million! See the progress continue here.

The Names Behind The Numbers

The Dallas Heart Walk is a part of Cooper history. Our founder, Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper started the local walk over 20 years ago and each year teammates do their part to walk and raise money for this worthy cause. We’re always looking for people to join us so if you’re in the area we’d love for you to walk with us. And if you need some added motivation this video from Cooper Aerobics CEO Dr. Tyler Cooper is sure to get you moving.

One other reason that gets all of us moving is realizing there are names behind the statistics of heart disease. As Dr. Tyler Cooper mentioned heart disease is the number one killer of Americans and stroke comes in at number 4. And each year over 800,000 people die from these diseases. But behind each stat is  someone’s mom, dad, sister or friend.

Michael Sula

Michael Sula, one of our Heart Walk Team Captains is proud to walk for his grandfather.

Yesterday we had the opportunity to meet with our Dallas American Heart Association representative, Ashley Lindsay, and visit teammates around our campus who are participating in the upcoming Dallas Heart Walk. We took photos of teammates we visited with a sign that read: “I’m walking for….” It was an opportunity to motivate everyone to meet their fundraising goal and remind them of the reason they walk.

Some said, they were walking for “my grandparents, my health, my city.” One said he was walking for his “dad, mother, brother—all victims of the disease.” And others gave specific names—like “Bill” and “Ryan.” This simple act of attaching a name to the disease gives us one more reason to do our best to reduce the number of names behind the statistics. It’s the reason we walk and raise funds.

Linda Mays and JessicaCandy

Jessica Candy and Linda Mays support the Dallas Heart Walk as Cooper Aerobics Team Captains.

Help us meet our fundraising goal here. Every dollar counts!

Who will you walk for? We encourage you to join us. As we mentioned If you live in the Dallas area join our team and register for the Dallas Heart Walk. If you’re not in our area you can find your local walk here.

We’ll see you on Sept. 7 at the Dallas Heart Walk. Make it a heart healthy day!

The Science and Art of Preventive Medicine

Every day physicians at Cooper Clinic use the science of medicine to determine the best course of action for patients. What many people don’t realize is that there’s also an art to medicine — the ability to figure out what’s best for each individual patient based on their unique circumstances.

 Over the last couple of weeks you may have heard Cooper Clinic and President George W. Bush in the news. As you may know he came in for an annual exam and a heart blockage was found during a stress test.  Since then there has been some media debate about the use of stress tests. We continue to believe that they are one of the best ways to determine changes in heart conditions, especially when used over time.

 We thought you may be interested in this article by Dr. Marc Sigel, a practicing internist, associate professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center and FOX News Channel contributor, published today on usatoday.com. The article outlines the need for physicians to personalize their approach to care when it comes to heart disease.  It’s a good reminder of how the art and science of medicine must come together to develop the right treatment plan for the patient.

Heart Disease: What’s Your Risk?

The topic of heart disease has been top-of-mind lately with several high-profile people experiencing cardiac events. Unfortunately these cases are not isolated. This year 635,000 Americans will have their first heart attack or die from coronary disease. Many of these deaths are preventable.

When stories such as these are highlighted in the news it tends to make us re-examine our own health. One of the challenges of managing heart disease is that in many cases there are no warning  symptoms before the occurrence of sudden death or symptoms of heart disease can be subtle says Nina Radford, MD, Director of Clinical Research and a cardiologist at Cooper Clinic.

Are you at risk for developing heart disease?

Dr. Radford is an advocate of knowing and minimizing your risk factors for heart disease. But how do you know if you’re at risk?  Dr. Radford suggests asking yourself these questions:

  • Do you smoke? Twenty percent of Americans still smoke despite well-described health risks associated with cigarette use. Throwing out your cigarettes is one of the most important things you can do to reduce your heart disease risk.
  • Are you overweight or obese? Almost two-thirds of the population is overweight or obese. Start by simply stepping on the scale to get an objective measure of your weight.
  • Do you have high blood pressure? One third of all Americans do.  Your risk of developing high blood pressure increases as you age. This is an easy risk factor to measure with a simple blood pressure cuff.
  • Do you have diabetes or elevated blood sugar? Almost 10 percent of adults have diabetes and another 38 percent have pre-diabetes. This can be diagnosed with a simple blood test to check blood sugar levels.
  • Do you have elevated cholesterol? About 15 percent of all adults have total cholesterol levels > 240 mg/dL.  High cholesterol can be diagnosed with a simple blood test known as a cholesterol profile.

How do you know if you already have heart disease?

Chances are, if you are a man 50 years or older or a woman 60 years or older, you may already have plaque build-up in your heart arteries. Many patients may have modest or moderate amounts of coronary artery atherosclerosis or plaque and with excellent control of risk factors, may never develop symptoms of clinical heart disease.

Other patients may develop symptoms of coronary heart disease that may be fairly easy to recognize such as feeling as if they have “an elephant sitting on their chest” making them short of breath, sick to their stomach and sweaty. Or the symptoms may be subtle such as feeling lightheaded with activity, experiencing reduced exercise tolerance or generalized fatigue.

The critical issue with the development of possible cardiac symptoms is having them evaluated urgently.

Your healthcare provider can help you understand and manage your risk of heart disease. It’s important that you schedule a comprehensive annual preventive exam and take a proactive approach to your heart health and your health in general.

If you’re interested in preventive exam at Cooper Clinic call 972.560.2667 or visit our website.