Archive

Posts Tagged ‘manage stress’

Stress Less Before the Holiday Season

October 20, 2015 Leave a comment

BlogStressFinalAs one of the busiest times of the year quickly approaches, many people begin to feel the effects of both personal and professional pressures. These causes of stress can be harmful to your health if not managed properly. Acute stress is short and intense in duration and impacts the central nervous system. Chronic stress lasts longer than 20 minutes and impacts the endocrine (hormonal) system. The human body is only designed to respond to acute stress – this is your “fight or flight” response. The body is not programmed to combat chronic stress, which is why those experiencing chronic stress often present health issues. Did you know…

  • 1/3 of people in the U.S. report experiencing extreme levels of stress
  • 1/5 report that they are experiencing high levels of stress 15 or more days per month
  • Stress keeps more than 40 percent of adults lying awake at night, according to American Psychological Association’s 2012 Stress in America™ survey

“Stress is part of life,” says Kenneth Cooper, MD, MPH, Founder and Chairman of Cooper Aerobics. Stress can increase your chance of suffering a heart attack and pose a serious threat to your health. But, “it’s not stress that kills, it’s the way you handle it,” Dr. Cooper notes.

Managing stress effectively can take many forms. It has been proven that a single session of 25-60 minutes of aerobic exercise increases positive mood feelings while also decreasing negative mood feelings. Additionally, eating healthy and nutritious foods can boost serotonin (the “happiness hormone”), folic acid and vitamins D and C. Taking time to breathe deeply, enjoy nature and go on vacation are other ways to combat the negative effects of stress.

Think you’ve got stress management down pat? Take our stress management quiz to find out!

  1. Can you identify the term referencing the science of laughter?
    a. Gelotology
    b. Laughotology
    c. Humorology
    d. Comedicology
  1. How can laughter and humor be beneficial to your health?
    a.They can decrease stress
    b. Laughter has some similarities to a brief workout (called “internal jogging”)
    c. Humor can help put your problems into a different perspective
    d. All of the above
  1. How can frequent or over-reactive anger be harmful to your health?
    a. “Anger-in” (internalized anger) can increase blood pressure and heart rate
    b. “Anger-out” (externalized anger) can damage relationships and social support, which are important stress buffers
    c. Both A and B
    d. Over-reactive anger can make you paranoid and anxious
  1. True or False? Being married is an important stress buffer.
  1. What is the term used when you experience too much stress?
    a. Overworked
    b. Distress
    c. Struggling
    d. Eustress

Answers: 1. A; 2. D; 3. C; 4. False: Not necessarily! A happy marriage is a great stress buffer, but being single is healthier than a bad marriage, which can increase unhealthy stress.; 5. B

5 Steps to Take Control of Your Diabetes

November 22, 2013 1 comment

November is American Diabetes Month aiming to raise awareness in the movement to Stop Diabetes®. Nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes. If you are battling the disease, learn five tips from Michael Clark, MD, a preventive medicine physician at Cooper Clinic, to help you take control of your health.

  1. Know your Diabetes: Knowledge is one of the best ways to combat diabetes. Diabetes is able to affect your entire body. Talk in depth and frequently with a diabetes educator and/or your physician to assure you are always up-to-date with the latest information. Aside from talking to your physician, make an effort to read the literature on diabetes. Thankfully, there are some great books available as well as online websites such as diabetes.org which give you important information in a structured, easy-to-understand way. Ultimately, every patient with diabetes should know their bodies and their condition better than anyone else, including their physician.
  2. Know Your Blood Sugar: How does diabetes affect you? Testing your blood sugar will not only let you see how you’re doing on a regular basis, but it should also help you understand your diabetes and inform your decision making. This could include choosing a suitable diet, knowing how activity affects you and how stressful days and illness should be managed. Furthermore, the more detail you record, the better prepared you will be when you meet with your physician.
  3. Pick the Right Diet: A healthy diet will help in a myriad of ways. The right diet will improve blood sugar levels, improve blood pressure and cholesterol, reduce tiredness, improve digestion and can significantly improve clarity of thought.
  4. Get in Activity: Minimal activity each day can help improve our health and help us feel more energetic through the day. Even a 20 minute walk or 15 minutes of push-ups and/or aerobics in your own living room will get the heart pumping. The effect of regular activity is also known to help increase insulin sensitivity, which can be useful for all types of diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes.
  5. Manage Sleep and Stress: Is your head hitting the pillow for at least eight hours per night? Getting at least eight hours of restful sleep will not only help manage your weight, but it will help keep your blood sugar levels in check.

With these helpful, managing tips, you will be able to tackle your diabetes head on.

For more information about Cooper Clinic or to schedule an appointment for a comprehensive physical exam, call 972.560.2667.