Archive

Posts Tagged ‘nutrition tips’

Healthy Eating Day Tips from the Pros

November 2, 2016 4 comments

Making healthy food choices most of the time is one of Dr. Cooper’s 8 Steps to Get Cooperized. It can be tough to consistently consume a healthy diet, even for the experts, but a few healthy eating tips can go a long way. Read on for the top tips and insider information from Cooper Clinic’s Registered Dietitian Nutritionists.

Elana PaddockRDN, LD, CDE

My favorite snack in the morning is an Alyssa’s Healthy Oatmeal Bites cookie paired with a cup of coffee and light vanilla soy milk. I love cookies, especially oatmeal raisin, and this one hits the spot. One cookie has only 45 calories, 1.5 grams fat, 4 grams of fiber and 1 gram of sugar.  I love that the first five ingredients are rolled oats, oat bran, ground flax, ground chia and dried fruit. It tastes so good that you wouldn’t think it was packed with such healthy ingredients. I look forward to this “guilt-free” treat!

Patty KirkRDN, LD

I love the following meal for a simple dinner at home but great for company, too. Plus it has a bonus of being healthy!

Marinated pork tenderloin cooked on the grill, diced potatoes roasted with garlic and drizzled lightly with olive oil, accompanied by roasted vegetables (mushrooms, asparagus, broccoli, carrots, onions).

Cynthanne DuryeaRDN, LD

My favorite dinner: I prepare white fish (cod or tilapia) in my electric rice and vegetable steamer according to the easy and clear instructions given in the manual (the steaming assures moist fish every time). While the fish is steaming, I sauté fresh baby spinach and sliced fresh mushrooms in a pan with a little olive oil. In a separate pan, I lightly heat sliced almonds in a pan until golden brown, lending a nice crunchy texture and toasted flavor.  I dish out the spinach and mushrooms onto a plate, top with steamed white fish and sprinkle the toasted sliced almonds on top of the fish. For a carbohydrate component, I add either brown rice or a slice of Seeduction Bread from Whole Foods.

My favorite breakfast: I batch cook several servings of McCann’s Steel Cut Oats. In the cooking water, I add chopped apple, pear, raisins, dried cherries, dried apricots or another fruit of choice. Then, each morning, I simply portion out a bowl of the cooked oats that have been cooked with the delicious fruits, and I microwave to heat the single portion. Then I add about 1/8 to ¼ cup of chopped walnuts, pecans or slivered almonds on top.  In preparing oats with fruit, a lot of flavor is added as well as nutrients…and there is no need to add sugar. The nuts on top add heart-healthy fat and some additional protein, making it very satisfying.

Molly WangsgaardMS, RDN, LD, NSCA-CPT

Batch cooking roasted veggies helps me have a healthy, filling dinner on busy weeknights. On the weekends and one other night during the week, I’ll roast a large pan of veggies and eat them for three meals. I’m able to make half my meal veggies and pair them with an egg sandwich, chicken breast, pork tenderloin or even a frozen meal.

Meridan ZernerMS, RDN, CSSD, LD

  • Breakfast – Two frozen Kashi waffles with almond butter
  • Morning Snack – Vanilla Greek yogurt with frozen blueberries
  • Lunch – Pita pocket with hummus, nitrate-free turkey, cucumbers, tomatoes and spinach
  • Afternoon snack – VitaTops muffin
  • Dinner – Trader Joe’s steamed shrimp dumplings, seeds of change quinoa blend, edamame and mandarin oranges
  • If the sweet tooth kicks in:  Three Dove dark chocolates or a Fudgesicle, cocoa dusted almonds or protein powder pudding

Kathy Duran-ThalRDN, LD

Some of my favorite meals are as follows:

  1. Luvo frozen entree mixed with Birdseye frozen veggies
  2. Chick-fil-A: Large fruit cup and grilled chicken wrap with ½ package of honey mustard dressing
  3. KFC Grilled chicken breast, corn on the cob and green beans
  4. Store-bought rotisserie chicken breast, small baked potato and asparagus
  5. Sweet potato sprinkled with lime juice and some salt, rotisserie chicken and roasted Brussels sprouts
  6. Low sodium V8 juice microwaved until hot in coffee mug, then add a few drops of Tabasco and a sprinkle of parmesan cheese. Place one slice of whole grain bread in toaster oven topped with a slice of low fat cheese.
  7. California rolls with salad bar, including edamame, etc.
  8. Chick-fil-A seasonal tortilla soup
  9. McDonald’s Egg White Delight and Yogurt Parfait

Colleen LovelandMS, RDN, LD, CDE

I love my instant oatmeal in the morning for breakfast with raisins and chopped walnuts added.  For a quick dinner, I go for salmon, brown rice steamer and steamed broccoli.  I love honeycrisp apples this time of year for snacking!

For more healthy eating tips, click here. To learn more about Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services, visit cooperclinicnutrition.com or call 972.560.2655.

How Many Calories Do You Need?

Recently, I visited FOX 4 Good Day with Cooper Clinic Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Meridan Zerner, MS, RDN, CSSD, LD, to ‘weigh in’ (pun-intended) on recent allegations of fitness bands and fitness technology making us fat.

If you don’t have a fitness band, the likelihood that you know someone who does is pretty high. Now there are even Tory Burch bracelets designed to make the Fitbit® Flex more fashionable to wear. The technology’s purpose is to help you achieve your health and fitness goals, but if you’re only receiving the data provided (i.e. calories burned and steps walked) you may misinterpret your results. Click here to watch Meridan’s explanation on Good Day. Her recommendation is to use the fitness technology as a tool and to educate yourself by meeting with a registered dietitian to learn your Resting Metabolic Rate for a baseline measurement.

After the news segment, I met with Colleen Loveland, MS, RD, LD, CDE, to try out the Resting Metabolic Rate test myself. Check out the video below!

For optimal relaxation, Colleen said she typically turns down the lights and plays soothing music. Since we wanted to capture it on video for our followers, we made a few adjustments. To learn more about the Resting Metabolic Rate at Cooper Clinic, visit our website or call 972.560.2655.

Eat More For Less

February 17, 2014 Leave a comment

What if you could eat more food for fewer calories? The trick is to fill up on the right foods that satisfy your hunger but carry a lower calorie count. These types of foods tend to be high in water and fiber content so you can eat in volume, feel fuller and consume a lesser amount of calories.

Calorie density is simply the number of calories in a certain volume of food.  Low calorie density foods have fewer calories per bite. For example, three cups of popcorn has only 80 calories. High calorie density foods are higher in calories for a smaller amount. One cup of nuts has more than 800 calories. Do the math and that’s eight times more calories than popcorn!

“The Ultimate Volumetrics Diet” by Barbara Rolls, introduces the concept of Volumetrics. The Volumetrics Plan is based on low calorie density options such as water-based and higher fiber foods like fruits, vegetables and broth soups, balanced out with other healthy choices such as high fiber whole grains, low-fat dairy and lean meats. Limit foods high in sugar and fat-even healthy fat found in nuts, avocados and olive oil (because of the high-calorie load).

Many years of research have proven that the quantity of food we eat has a greater impact on satiety than the actual number of calories. Satiety is the full feeling at the end of a meal that signals our brain that we have eaten enough. This is great news for many of us who like to eat a fuller plate of food and still slim down. It follows the My Plate guidelines of filling half your plate with vegetables, one quarter with lean protein and one quarter with healthy carbs. So how is this done? See the tips below for tricks to eat more for less.

How to Volumize Your Diet:

  1. Pile on the vegetables. Vegetables are one of the best examples of low energy density foods because they contain high water and fiber content for a minimal number of calories.  Plus they are super-nutritious! One half cup of cooked vegetables or 2 cups of leafy greens has about 25 calories and an average of two grams of satisfying fiber. Pile your plate with volumes of Brussels sprouts, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, okra, spinach, kale and romaine lettuce.
  2. Fill up on fluids. Choose water-rich foods such as fruit to accompany a meal or as a fiber-packed snack. One serving of most fruits has about 60 calories, such as 1 ¼ cup strawberries or watermelon and ¾ cup blackberries, blueberries or fresh pineapple. Other ways to get more volume from fluid is to serve a broth-based soup prior to or with a meal or drink a glass of water or a sugar-free beverage before a meal.
  3. Slash the fat. Cut down on oil, butter, eggs and high-fat dairy, such as whole milk, cream, full fat salad dressings and cheese. Replace these with lower fat options such as fat free milk, reduced fat cheese, lower fat dressings, egg whites and non-fat yogurt. Choose leaner meats, fish and skinless poultry, and trim any visible fat.

Simple Swaps: Choose This vs. That

  • One cup air-popped popcorn (31 calories) vs. one cup regular potato chips (137 calories)
  • One cup grapes (104 calories) vs. one cup raisins (434 calories)
  • One cup Kashi® GOLEAN Crunch!® Cereal (190 calories) vs. one cup Kellogg’s® Low Fat Granola (380 calories)
  • One cup Progresso® Vegetable Minestrone soup (100 calories) vs. one cup Campbell’s® Cream of Mushroom soup (200 calories)
  • One Yasso Greek frozen yogurt bar (80 calories) vs. one Ben & Jerry’s Vanilla ice cream bar (300 calories)

For more nutrition tips, download the Cooper Clinic Nutrition brochure, call 972.560.2655 or request an appointment online.

Nutrition Nuggets

Our amazing team of registered dietitians!

Saturday was the 2012 Nutrition Seminar presented by Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services. For many of our attendees, their interest is often piqued when a friend tells them about their “great new diet” and the quick results that they’ve experienced. At Cooper we share lots of nutrition-related articles, hoping to help others learn healthy ways to improve their diet. With so many contradictory messages, it’s important to know the facts.

Our amazing team of registered dietitians cleared up the confusion this weekend. They dissected the latest diet trends and offered practical health tips that attendees could walk away with and incorporate into their daily life.

Here are a few takeaways from our rockstar dietitians:

  • Some of the most popular foods of 2012 include: salmon, greek yogurt, almonds, green leafy vegetables like kale and berries.
  • Gluten free diets are popular right now, but only three million Americans have actually been diagnosed with celiac disease. You should get tested by a dietitian and diagnosed with celiac disease before you make any adjustments to your diet.
  • Drink more green tea –Two cups a day can boost your metabolism and reduce caloric intake.
  • Is sugar toxic? Likely no, but in excess… problematic and unhealthy!
  • Combine a protein, carbohydrate and healthy fat at most meals to sustain energy and curb hunger.
  • Eating your favorite foods is part of healthy and sustainable weight loss. (This means you can eat frozen yogurt… in moderation, of course!)
  • And one of our personal favorites… a little bit of chocolate never hurts anyone.

Did you also know that you can meet with our dietitians to analyze your diet and develop a personalized plan of action to improve your nutrition? You can click here or call 972.560.2655 for more information.

What’s your favorite healthy food?