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Posts Tagged ‘prediabetes’

Sit Less, Move More – Exercise Guidelines for Diabetes and Prediabetes

November 14, 2016 Leave a comment

By Elana Paddock, RDN, LD, CDE, Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services

Many people with diabetes do not exercise despite all of its proven benefits. If you have diabetes or prediabetes, physical activity is more than just a way to lose weight – it can also make it easier to keep your blood glucose (sugar) levels closer to normal.

When you have diabetes, your body’s insulin action is less effective in storing glucose and regulating your blood sugars, but exercise sensitizes insulin. During exercise, stored glucose becomes a source of energy for your muscles and as the stores gets depleted, your blood sugar goes down and can stay down for 24-48 hours.

What types and amounts of physical activity are recommended for diabetes?

  • Aerobic exercise includes brisk walking, bicycling, swimming, aerobics, elliptical, dancing, rowing, tennis and stair climbing. Engage in at least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity weekly, spread over at least three days per week, with no more than two consecutive days without activity.
  • Resistance training includes exercises with weight machines, free weights, elastic resistance bands, body weight and group strength training classes. Perform these at least two times a week on non-consecutive days.
  • Balance and flexibility training includes yoga and tai chi. Aim for two or three times a week.
  • Light-intensity activities daily (read below under “updates”).

To better fit your schedule, you can break up 30 minutes into 10- or 15-minute segments several times a day. Research has shown the health benefits are similar. Recent studies have also shown that a 15-minute walk after meals can help lower your blood sugar.

What are the updates in the latest exercise guidelines?

People with diabetes are advised to incorporate “light” activities throughout the day, particularly when sedentary for prolonged periods of time (working on the computer, sitting in a meeting or watching TV). Take a light activity break for three minutes for every 30 minutes of sitting. Examples include:

  • Overhead arm stretches
  • Leg extensions
  • Torso twists
  • Walking in place

Exercise Tips:

  • Have a very specific plan. Define what, when, where and for how long you’re going to commit to working out. This will improve your chances of adherence and success.
  • What kind of exercises will you do? Make a list of activities and be creative. If you enjoy what you’re doing, you’re more likely to stick with it!
  • When are you going to fit in a workout? Make a schedule of the specific days and times you will exercise. Prioritize them on your calendar as “appointments.”
  • Are you going to exercise at a gym, in a group class, at a park or track or at home using a workout DVD or technology app? Decide what might work best for you.
  • Do you prefer to exercise solo, with a buddy, in a class or with a personal trainer? Participating in supervised training may provide more health benefits for people with diabetes than non-supervised programs. Plus, the accountability to others can be very motivating.
  • How long will you exercise? Be realistic and set achievable goals. If you are brand new to working out, start with 10 minutes and build up to 30 minutes or more.
  • Keep a log of your exercise to stay on track. You can use fitness technology resources like a pedometer, fitness band or exercise watch to track steps, calories and heart rate. Don’t forget to give yourself credit for what you do-every step counts!

When you have diabetes, prioritize exercise as part of your lifestyle to better control your blood sugars. Beyond managing your diabetes, exercise can help you feel better about yourself and improve your overall health.

For more information about preventing and managing diabetes and prediabetes, visit the Cooper Aerobics website.

All Fruits can Fit, Even with Diabetes

December 10, 2012 2 comments

Diabetic Friendly FruitHave you ever wondered if fruit is healthy to eat when you have diabetes or prediabetes? It is! Fruits are packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber, much like vegetables. Since fruit contains carbohydrates and turns to sugar, it’s wise not to eat with utter abandon. The total number of carbohydrates affects your blood sugars, regardless of whether the source is from sugar or starch.

Another common myth is that you should not eat certain types of fruit, either because they taste very sweet or contain too much sugar. The truth is all fruits contain sugar and can fit into your meal plan – the key is how much you eat! One serving contains 15 grams of carbohydrate. The serving size depends on the amount of carbohydrates in the fruit. Some fruits have more carbohydrates than others, but as long as you eat one serving, your blood sugar will be affected the same amount.

Here are some examples of 15 grams of carbohydrates of fruit:

  • 1 ¼ cup whole strawberries or chopped watermelon
  • 1 cup raspberries or chopped cantaloupe or honeydew
  • ¾ cup blueberries, blackberries or fresh pineapple
  • 1 small apple, orange or kiwi
  • 17 small grapes
  • 2 Tbsp. dried fruit (raisins, cranberries, mixed dried fruit)
  • 2 Clementines or small plums
  • ½ cup mixed fresh fruit
  • ½ large banana or grapefruit

Things to remember:

  • Aim for two to four servings of fruit per day.
  • Choose whole produce in favor of juice.
  • Make sure canned fruit is in its own juice.
  • Dried fruit is convenient, but the serving size is a fraction of the fresh version.
  • Frozen fruit is a great option for off season.
  • Go for variety and try to capture all the colors of the rainbow to maximize antioxidant (cancer fighting) benefits.

When you are trying to incorporate more fruit into your diet, try ready-to-go precut fruit for convenience. You can pack one or two pieces of fruit from home each day and have one with lunch and the other for a snack. Fruit is also makes for a great after dinner treat.

If you have diabetes or prediabetes you can eat fruit with confidence because it’s nutrient dense and a great way to get your sweet fix.