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Posts Tagged ‘Tennis’

Cooper Fitness Center Pro Zone

June 22, 2017 1 comment

Welcome to the Cooper Fitness Center Pro Zone! This monthly blog post will be the place to learn all about our Cooper Fitness Center sports professionals, the programs they offer and how sports training can benefit you. From tennis, swimming and basketball to boxing and martial arts, we have a pro for you!

Whether you’re looking to add a new level to your workout routine, participate in a group exercise program or enhance existing athletic skills, you’ll accomplish your goals with our pros. Get to know Mike, Corey, Derrick, Marni, Andre and Coleman below:

Mike Proctor, Martial Arts Pro: 45+ years of Pro-Zone-Mike-Proctorexperience

Q: How did you begin practicing martial arts?

A: I began practicing the martial ways as a child growing up in a U.S. military household. In 1962, I began to take lessons in various styles of the arts.

Q: For those setting health and fitness resolutions, what is your number one tip for success?

A: Each New Year brings reflections of the past and visions of the future, along with a body that is a year older. It is never too late to challenge yourself with new activities and a healthier lifestyle.

Q: What is one thing you wish everybody knew about martial arts?

A: Martial arts demand focus and dependability. These are two aspects of character essential to meet any challenge, whether set by oneself or by life. To quote Winston Churchill, “Never, never, never give up.” It worked for Great Britain in 1940, and it will work for you in 2016!

Corey Noel, Tennis Pro: 10+ years of experience Pro-Zone-CoreyNoel

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching tennis?

A: I love teaching tennis because it’s a lifelong sport. It’s my biggest passion and I love seeing the enjoyment on players’ faces when they learn a new skill or see improvement in their game.

Q: For those setting health and fitness resolutions, what is your number one tip for success?

A: Set achievable, concrete goals. Ideas such as “lose weight” or “eat healthier” are positive goals, but are difficult to achieve and measure. Setting specific week-to-week or even day-to-day goals are easier to achieve and keep you in line with what you’re aiming for overall.

Q: How do you define good sportsmanship?

A: I define good sportsmanship as playing the game with integrity and common courtesy, much the same way we should all try to live our lives. It means giving your opponent the benefit of the doubt, recognizing that fun should be the primary goal of any sport and playing each game or match to the best of your abilities and with maximum effort.

Derrick James, Boxing Pro: 35+ years of experience Pro-Zone-Derrick-James

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching boxing?

A: I enjoy the interaction I have with my clients and members – they are always eager to learn and to work hard.

Q: Who was the primary influence when you were introduced to boxing, and who is your greatest role model?

A: My mother and my boxing coach are my biggest influences, and also my role models. They always had high standards and I didn’t ever want to disappoint them.

Q: How do you define good sportsmanship?

A: A good sport is someone who is able to take a loss with the same grace as they embrace and enjoy a victory.

Marni Kerner, Swim Pro: 15+ years of experience Pro-Zone-Marni-Kerner

Q: What is your favorite thing about Cooper?

A: There are so many things I love about Cooper! Perhaps at the top of my list is knowing I am part of a community that is surrounded by the most amazing resources for health and fitness knowledge, opportunities and experience.

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching swimming?

A: I love teaching confidence in the water. I believe it carries over into other aspects of life. Swimming can be very technical and challenging, so I often see a growing sense of pride alongside skill improvement, which leads to the health benefits swimming can provide. I am also happy to know I am teaching a lifelong sport and perhaps lifesaving skills.

Q: Who is your favorite role model, and why is he or she important to you?

A: My father is an amazing role model. At almost 80 years of age, he portrays a Cooperized lifestyle. He stays fit with daily exercise, including swimming!

Andre Vahdat, Assistant Tennis Pro: 10+ years of experience

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Q: What is one thing you wish everyone knew about tennis?

A: Tennis is incredibly beneficial for the health of your body. It is a full body workout that you can do from your young years all the way to your senior years. It’s a great aerobic exercise that keeps your heart healthy.

Q: When did you begin playing tennis?

A: I began playing tennis at the age of 8. I  would play with my parents just for fun.

Q: Are you right or left handed?

A: Right

Q: Who would you like to play tennis against most?

A: My son. When the time comes, he can challenge me!

Coleman Crawford, Basketball Pro: 40 years of experience Pro-Zone-Coleman-Crawford

Q: For those setting health and fitness resolutions, what is your number one tip for success?

A: I would suggest people set attainable goals, be consistent with efforts to achieve those goals and listen to your body throughout the entire process. Always pay close attention to your health.

Q: What are some of your favorite basketball memories?

A: Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) basketball games…and meeting Michael Jordan!

Q: If you could train in another sport under another sports pro, what would it be?

A: Boxing with CFC Boxing Pro Derrick James.

Tune in for more information and news about Cooper Fitness Center Sports Pros at cooperfitnesscenter.com/ProZone.

 

How to Prepare for a Tennis Tournament

February 1, 2017 Leave a comment

Tennis is one of the few sports you can start at any age and play competitively. Training with a goal in mind, such as competing in match play or a tournament, can be a great motivating factor to improve your skills on the court and overall fitness.

Tournaments and leagues are separated by age division and/or skill level, which allows people to meet others on their same level of experience. If you’re planning on adding a dose of competition to your tennis routine, signing up to play in a tournament can be an exciting opportunity. Cooper Fitness Center Tennis Pro Corey Noel offers his top 10 tips for preparing to compete in a tennis tournament:

  1. Get a good night’s sleep. Follow your regular bedtime routine, and make sure to get the recommended 7-9 hours of sleep to be well-rested and at the top of your game.
  2. Eat and hydrate properly 24-48 hours before the tournament. Stick to your healthy diet and use food as fuel for your body. Follow the recommended hydration guidelines and make sure to bring your water bottle to the tournament.
  3. Focus on conditioning and match practice in the week leading up to a tournament. There’s less of a need to focus on technique.
  4. Identify your goals and strategies before the tournament begins.
  5. Have all your necessary equipment in top shape (rackets freshly strung, court shoes broken in, etc.). Make sure to bring the proper clothing and accessories – layers if it’s chilly and a hat and sunglasses if it’s sunny. An extra pair of socks can come in handy, too. Pack sunscreen, water and healthy snacks for fuel.
  6. Stretch before and after each match to keep yourself loose and to help your muscles recover.
  7. Know your limitations. A tournament can test your physical and mental acuity; recognize where your breaking point is and don’t go past it.
  8. Pick the right division for your skill level. If you’re playing with a partner, make sure you work well together and have practiced together before the tournament.
  9. It’s just tennis! Don’t get overwhelmed by the fact that you’re playing in a tournament. Concentrate on using the skills you’ve developed and try to play your best.
  10. Have fun!

Tennis programs at Cooper Fitness Center are open to the public. Visit cooperfitnesscenter.com to learn more.

Off the Court with Tennis Pro Corey Noel

October 14, 2016 Leave a comment

corey-noelCatching Cooper Fitness Center Tennis Pro Corey Noel anywhere outside of the courts can be a challenge, but he wouldn’t have it any other way. With more than 15 years of experience coaching tennis and a variety of tournament championships under his belt, Corey brings expertise and focus on the game to adults and children alike through Cooper Fitness Center’s tennis programs. Get to know Corey on a more personal level:

When were you first introduced to tennis?

I started playing tennis when I was 15 years old, which is a little late to begin. I joined my high school team and loved it! It’s never too late to try a new sport, especially a lifelong sport such as tennis.

What is your favorite memory of playing tennis?

I once played a match in college in which my opponent was very unpleasant and bickered quite a bit. The official eventually came out and gave him an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. We continued playing, and I won. Immediately after the match ended, my opponent was upset about losing and was issued another unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. Since our match was over and the rules called for the penalty to be applied to another match, the official gave the penalty to his teammate playing on another court. The teammate then lost his match as well. I like to say I won two matches at once because of the incident!

What is your favorite memory of coaching tennis?

Coaching is challenging. I once had a job of coaching a high school tennis team full of beginners. We had 12 students on the team, and by the time the season ended, eight of them went to the state championship. It was extremely rewarding to see the improvements they made that season as individuals and a team.

Who has been your biggest influence in the world of tennis?

My college coach, Bryan Whitt, helped me develop as a player and later helped me kick off my career as a tennis pro. He has offered me plenty of coaching advice over the years, and still coaches at The University of Texas at Dallas.

Who is your biggest role model?

My dad is my biggest role model, because he is kind and respectful in all circumstances. He fully lives by the rule of treating others as you would want to be treated.

What’s your favorite workout, other than playing tennis?

I love to cycle. I’m usually very competitive when it comes to sports and exercise, but riding a bike is one of the only times I’m able to let go and just enjoy the activity.

What do you consider to be your greatest accomplishment professionally? Personally?

On the personal side, I’m proud of how I paid for my degree myself. I worked all through college and never had to take out a student loan. As a professional, being named Tennis Pro at Cooper has been incredible, and it was also amazing to be selected to sit on the Dallas Professional Tennis Association Board of Directors.

If you could play a match against one tennis celebrity, who would it be?

Andre Agassi. He’s always been my favorite player.

How long have you worked at Cooper?

Three years.

What is your favorite part about working at Cooper?

The people at Cooper are amazing and very friendly. Everyone here is passionate about exercise and self-improvement, which is a culture you would be hard-pressed to find anywhere else.

What would you tell someone who is new to playing tennis and looking to improve their game?

Learning to play tennis is all about commitment and repetition. Get out on the court three or four days a week or as much as possible in order to work on all aspects of the game. It can be tough, but well worth it.

What’s your favorite thing to do in down time when you are not on the courts?

What’s down time?! Just kidding! I like to relax and watch TV or Netflix, and I’ve been traveling more.

If you weren’t coaching tennis, what other profession would you have gotten into?

I actually studied to be a teacher, so I would likely be teaching high school English and coaching tennis at the high school level.

What do you believe you teach/offer besides just technical tennis skills (i.e. confidence, teamwork in doubles play, etc.)?

As a coach, I try to teach problem solving. Tennis is the only major sport in which coaches are not allowed to actually coach during a match, so it’s important to teach my players independence and how to make decisions to improve their game on their own. There’s a lot of psychology that goes behind the game of tennis.

Corey points out that one of the most important things to know about tennis is that it’s a sport anyone can play, no matter of age, gender or experience. This makes it different from most sports, but is what he likes most about it. He says it’s rewarding to see his students grow and pick up new skills quickly, and then enjoy playing tennis as a lifelong sport.

For more information about Corey and the tennis programs at Cooper Fitness Center, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com or call 972.233.4832, ext. 4311.

Fighting Childhood Obesity through Play

 

Childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past 30 years. In 2012, more than one third of children and adolescents were overweight or obese. Unhealthy kids are growing into unhealthy adults, causing a major health care problem in the United States.

When it comes to helping kids form healthy habits, it’s best to start young. Studies have shown that different types of exercise affect a child’s mental capacity in a variety of ways. A simple 20-minute walk can immediately affect a child’s attention, function and academic success. However, the reverse is true for highly structured, rule-based exercise, such as a sport or coordination drills. This type of exercise may be too taxing for children immediately before a test or other activity that requires sustained focus. Instead, higher intensity exercises seem to build a child’s attention span gradually over time. Children who are physically fit perform better in attention tests–even small improvements in fitness lead to noticeable changes in the brain.

Participating in sports or other fitness-driven activities, especially right after the school day, can be a natural and less forced outlet to allow children to build up their attention span while having fun. Cooper Fitness Center’s IGNITE! program combines fitness, sports, movement and games to help improve athletic performance for this purpose. In the long run, children are learning how to focus for future tests and other tasks that require concentration.

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Kids develop athletic skills during Cooper Fitness Center’s IGNITE! program.

Various studies have linked academic performance to overall health and fitness in children. Data taken from students in California show the following relationships between fitness and academics:

  • Higher levels of fitness = increased math testing scores
  • Higher levels of fitness = increased language arts testing scores
  • Healthier lunches = increased math and language arts testing scores
  • Higher levels of fitness = higher school attendance rate
  • Higher levels of fitness = fewer negative school incidents

A study of more than 2.4 million Texas students found that students who are physically fit are more likely to do well on the state’s standardized tests and have higher school attendance. Physically fit students are also less likely to have disciplinary problems. The Cooper Institute developed FitnessGram, the first “student fitness report card,” in an effort to improve school physical education programs and children’s health.

“The impact exercise has on the growing brain is unparalleled,” says Kenneth H. Cooper, MD, MPH, founder and chairman of Cooper Aerobics. “Increased exercise improves cardiovascular health, and that helps the brain function more efficiently and enhances its ability to learn.”

Playing sports such as tennis or basketball can help children improve their attention while also helping them reach a higher level of fitness, which is beneficial to them at both a young age and as they grow into adults.

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Improving skills on the court with Cooper Fitness Center Tennis Pro Corey Noel.

It is recommended that students do at least 60 minutes of vigorous or moderate-intensity physical activity every day, with more than half occurring during regular school hours and the remaining outside of school. Estimates suggest only about half of U.S. children meet this guideline.

Cooper Fitness Center offers various after-school youth programs to help kids get up and moving while boosting their brain power. Learn more about sport-specific programming and other youth programs at cooperyouth.com/dallas.

Game. Set. Match.

The clay has been prepared. The lines have been freshly drawn. Today marks the first day of the 2012 French Open (or Roland Garros, for anyone following along in Paris), the second of the four annual Grand Slam tennis tournaments. Two full weeks of riveting matches – what more could you ask for?

Tennis is one of my favorite hobbies. I guess I could say it’s one of my favorite “workouts,” but when I play I typically forget I’m even working out! For me tennis is a way to have fun and socialize with friends. In honor of National Tennis month, I went ahead and asked our experts at Cooper Fitness Center in Dallas to share a few health benefits of playing tennis:

  • Tennis provides good caloric burn, especially if you’re playing singles.
  • Since you’re moving around the court in different directions, tennis is a great activity to work on speed, agility and power.
  • It’s also great at helping with eye hand coordination.

We’re fortunate to have four tennis courts here at our Cooper Aerobics campus in Dallas. But if you’re looking for a nearby court where you live, the United States Tennis Association (USTA) can help you find a court.

So don’t just enjoy watching the French Open on TV, head outside and serve up a game.