Make a Splash this Summer with a Pedicure from Cooper Spa

As the seasons change, so do nail trends. This summer, Cooper Spa offers colors and products that will give your pedicure that perfect pop of color using safe and sanitary products.

Cooper Spa holds itself to the highest standards by using a fresh set of sterilized implements for each client and cleaning the pedicure tubs thoroughly after each use. Cooper Spa assistant manager Erika Bazan shares, “we recently had a state inspector tell us we are ‘a breath of fresh air’ because of our overall cleanliness.”

Staying true to Cooper Aerobics’ core value of prevention, Cooper Spa exclusively offers Zoya nail polish due to their clean ingredients. Zoya products are free of chemicals that can cause hormone disruption which could eventually lead to cancer. Along with their preventive benefits, they also give you a vibrant, fresh-looking color that lasts longer. With several different options, you are sure to find a color you love.

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Can’t choose just one? Cooper Spa’s summer polish collection of choice comes from Zoya’s new line, “Sunshine.” There is a color for everyone in this collection of 12 ranging from nudes to bright pinks. “Clementine” is expected to be the number one polish Cooper Spa clients are sure to love. Make a splash this summer with this soft pink polish with orange undertones, accompanied with a hint of gold shimmer.

Since July is the busiest month of the year for beach vacations, it is also the most popular time for pedicures in salons and spas. However, did you know that salt, sand and chlorine are some of the harshest substances to your polish? After a week at the beach, your pedicure will likely have suffered.

Beyond the polish, pedicures help keep your feet healthy. With each service provided, our highly trained technicians share their expertise with clients about the benefits of healthy and beautiful hands and feet. Follow these simple tips from experts at Cooper Spa to ensure your feet stay pedicure perfect:

  • Purchase the same polish you choose in the spa for touch ups when needed.
  • Always apply a top coat to seal in color and give off shine.
  • Apply Intense Overnight Foot Repair Balm regularly to keep your feet soft and smooth. Available at Cooper Spa.

Amp up your new color with our Cooper Spa summer specials to get healthy, glowing legs, feet and especially perfectly pedicured toes:

  • Sweet Summer Glow seasonal services, June 25-August 31– manicure, pedicure and body treatment featuring FarmHouse Fresh® Sweet Cream skincare products
  • Summer Complements, July 2-August 31– complimentary cuticle soak with a 60-minute pedicure
Categories: Cooper Updates

Swimming for Injury Recovery

When Cooper Fitness Center member Lyndee Myers took a 15-mile hiking trip to Big Bend in May of 2017, she didn’t expect to come back with an injury.

“I was wearing hiking boots for the entire trip but I evidently didn’t have the best arch supports,” says Myers. “Because of that, I developed plantar fasciitis in my foot.”

Myers has always been active. In fact, she’s been a devoted member of Female Focus at the fitness center for nearly a decade. When she returned from her vacation, she found exercise painful. That’s when she knew she needed help.

“I went to the podiatrist, ended up seeing three doctors, did cortisone shots, stem cell injections, physical therapy,” says Myers. “I even took six weeks off from exercising, which didn’t help at all.”

Myers thought she had tried it all until Cooper Fitness Center Swim Pro Marni Kerner Swim1suggested she try getting in the pool. Myers had only swam for fun, never for sport, but decided to give it a try.

“I was really apprehensive at first, but when you want to feel better, you do what you have to do,” says Myers. “I started  lessons in April of 2018. They were about an hour, twice a week.”

“Swimming is extremely low impact, so it’s a great option for exercise when you’re recovering from an injury,” says Kerner. “Swimming can also help reduce inflammation, which can help reduce pain.”

Swimming also provides a cardiovascular benefit, helping to increase your heart rate and burn more calories. In fact, swimming is considered one of the top five aerobic exercises.

After two months of twice weekly hour-long lessons, Myers now swims with Kerner for 30 minutes. On the days she doesn’t have a lesson, you can find Myers swimming on her own using techniques she’s learned. She also works on stretches at home, which Kerner recommended, making it a great form of recovery both in and out of the water.

“My plantar fasciitis hasn’t totally gone away, but it’s at the point where it’s much more manageable,” says Myers. “I feel better after swimming. That’s what keeps me coming back.”

“She’s going through her recovery without pain and receiving cardiovascular benefits,” says Kerner. “I can’t think of any client who hasn’t stuck with swimming after an injury. It becomes a life-long sport.”

To learn more about swimming lessons available or to schedule a private lesson, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com.

 

Categories: Cooper Updates

Get Creative with Corn

Who can’t have a summer cookout without fresh corn on the cob? In fact, summer is when corn is at its prime!

Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services provides you with a variety of ways to incorporate this a-maizing food into your summer recipes.

Corn Facts

  • Corn is known as “maize” in most countries, which originates from the Spanish word “maiz.”
  • One ear of corn contains approximately 800 kernels in 16 rows (the number of rows is always an even number).
  • Corn is technically and nutritionally a grain, not a vegetable. The seed comes from a type of grass, such as wheat.
  • The most common edible corn is “sweet corn,” which can appear white, yellow orDelicious Grilled Mexican Cornbi-colored. Corn can also be found in black, bluish-gray, purple, green and red.
  • More than 3,500 various uses exist for corn products─most are for non-food purposes.
  • In the food industry, corn is a major ingredient in foods such as cereal, peanut butter, potato chips, baby food, marshmallows, ice cream, salad dressing, cooking oil, margarine, mayonnaise, chewing gum, juice and soft drinks.
  • High-fructose corn syrup is a manufactured corn sweetener found widely in processed foods, including soft drinks. The sweetener is known to have negative health effects including increasing triglycerides, which is the main source of fat buildup in the arteries.

Nutritional Benefits

Corn contains an array of health benefits including fiber, B vitamins (thiamin and folate), beta carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin (for eye health). It is naturally low in fat and sodium and is a fantastic source of dietary fiber. Corn is a whole grain that provides a good source of premium carbohydrate fuel and counts toward your recommended three servings or more of whole grains per day.

  • One ear (85 g) 
  • 110 calories
  • 1 g fat
  • 0 mg sodium
  • 23 g carbohydrates
  • 4 g fiber

Top 10 Ways to Relish Corn 

  • Make a roasted corn salsa─great on burgers, in quesadillas or as a dip for baked tortilla chips
  • Add corn to your taco salad
  • Prepare a black bean and corn salad as a quick side dish
  • Mix corn into your favorite cornbread recipe
  • Add corn to a chili or chowder recipe
  • Spice it up with chili powder or sprinkle with a small amount of Parmesan cheese
  • Add to your favorite guacamole recipe
  • Sauté corn in a small amount of heart-healthy olive or avocado oil
  • Bring out the smokiness by cooking it on the grill! Many grocery stores sell grilled corn in the prepared food section
  • Microwave for easy prep
    • Remove silk and wash kernels
    • Close husks around corn
    • Microwave for 1-2 minutes until cooked

Buying and Usage Tips

  • Buy corn in its peak season, which is mid-to-late summer
  • Choose ears with green husks, fresh silks and tight rows of kernels
  • Refrigerate with husks on and use within two days for prime sweetness

 

Provided by Elana Paddock, RDN, LD, CDE and Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services.

Categories: Cooper Updates

Serving Up Summertime Tennis Tips

Tennis is a year-round sport, but the difference between indoor and outdoor play can affect your performance in a big way.

“A lot of people go into hibernation mode in the winter and then come out in the summer and realize they’re not as prepared as they thought,” says Cooper Fitness Center Tennis Pro Corey Noel.

Whether for recreation or competitive, Noel offers tips to help ensure you’re prepared when it comes to playing during the dog days of summer.

Training

During the summer months, almost every tennis league holds matches outdoors. To get 78479731_tennisacclimated to the heat, Noel says training outside is essential.

“If you’re not practicing outdoors and doing drills outdoors, you’re not going to be ready,” says Noel. Noel suggests practicing outside during the same time of day you’ll be competing. For example, if your tennis match is at noon, try practicing outside during that time.

“It’s going to be hot, but challenge yourself to stay out longer each time,” says Noel. “The first day, try playing an hour during the heat of the day and an hour and a half the second day. Eventually, you will notice your endurance increase.”

Remember, you can’t quit during a tennis match just because you’re too hot. Most importantly, be consistent with your play times. Noel recommends playing at least once a week in the summer to help acclimate your body to the heat as quickly as possible.

You Are What You Eat (And Drink)

When it comes to playing tennis in the heat of the day, what you eat and drink is important.

Noel recommends hydrating 18-24 hours prior to playing. As for food, try consuming a high-carb meal the night before. The day of play, eat something lighter, such as an energy or protein bar.

“I’ve seen people who are in great shape come out and play in the heat and they struggle because they didn’t prepare properly,” says Noel.

Noel suggests packing plenty of water, sports drinks and energizing snacks, as you will have breaks in between your time on the court.

“A tennis match is no finite amount of time, so if you’re only prepared for an hour match and it goes three hours, that can really have an impact on your performance,” says Noel.

Noel’s pre-match routine is to drink a combination of water and a sports drink, such as Gatorade, about 12-18 hours before he plays.

 

Take Advantage of Breaks

Tennis is a sport, like football, where players have designated breaks. Noel say it’s important to utilize that time to not only hydrate, but seek shade when you can, especially as you switch sides.

“You want to be out in the sun as little as possible,” says Noel. “Keep in mind, the surface of the court is 25-30 degrees hotter than the actual air temperature.”

That means on a 90 degree day, it can be as hot as 120 degrees on the court. Keep these tips in mind to help keep you at peak performance while on the court.

  • Get plenty of sleep the night before
  • Wear light-colored clothing
  • Wear sunscreen that’s SPF 30 or higher
  • Wear a hat to help shade your face and protect your scalp from the sun

For more information about tennis programs at Cooper Fitness Center or to register for tennis lessons, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com.

Categories: Cooper Updates

Why Everyone Should Try Pilates

If you have never participated in a Pilates class, the workout might seem a little intimidating. If you ask Cooper Fitness Center Pilates Instructor Sarah Paxton, she loves Pilates because it is unique, effective and anyone can do it.

The benefits of Pilates are unlike anything you can get from any other workout. When doing Pilates, you are not only getting stronger and fitter, you are also practicing corrective movement. The movements and exercises in Pilates train your body how to move without injury which can be beneficial in any exercise or everyday activity.Sarah Paxton_Pilates in Studio_3377_5x7

“You work from the inside out. A lot of people call it ‘the inner unit,’” Paxton said. “You’re working all the tiny muscles that hold your bones together – the muscles that people don’t really talk about.”

While most people are capable of performing Pilates, it requires a small learning curve considering the uniqueness of the workout. Students typically start on the most common piece of Pilates equipment, the reformer. It is a raised platform with an adjustable bar, springs to create resistance for various exercises and a mat to support the back, neck and knees.

At first glance, the equipment can appear complicated and hard to use. However, the “bells and whistles” are there to provide support. With the assistance provided by the equipment, it is almost impossible to perform Pilates incorrectly, which significantly reduces the risk of injury during your workout.

With an internal focus on strength and balance, many people find themselves using muscles they have never used before. The transverse abdominal muscles are the deepest layer of your abdominals, making them very difficult to activate with any other form of exercise. However, Pilates is designed to work these muscles to strengthen even the deepest part of your core.

“[With Pilates,] I feel like everything I do is more effective,” Paxton said. “Whether it’s walking or doing some pull-ups, I feel like my muscles and joints are safer. You can take the benefits of Pilates to all of your classes. That’s the beauty of it.”

Pilates is beneficial to all fitness levels. The exercises can be easily modified to accommodate your needs. It is also ideal for people with certain injuries or disabilities.Cooper_Pilates_9_9_162026

“My oldest client right now is 86, but I have trained a 90-year-old,” Paxton said. “Pilates equipment is conducive to people who have had injuries or maybe are missing a limb or are paralyzed. We have a client who is in a wheelchair. I have several clients who have Parkinson’s. The beauty of Pilates is there is no limit of your ability or age or size or limitations.”

If you are interested in giving Pilates a try, there is no better time than now. The benefits you gain from it are worth stepping out of your comfort zone and trying something new. For information about Cooper Fitness Center’s Pilates program, click here or call 972.233.4832. At Cooper Fitness Center, new members receive one complimentary private Pilates session to get acclimated to the equipment and movements.

Categories: Cooper Updates

Learning To Swim Later in Life

According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 10 people in the U.S. die from unintentional drowning every day. Of these 10, eight are over the age of 14.

“Everyone should know how to swim, whether you’re doing it for safety reasons or for fitness,” says Cooper Fitness Center Swim Pro Marni Kerner.

While many think swimming lessons are just for kids, Kerner says it’s never too late to learn this important skill- one which may one day save your life.

Swimming Statistics

A 2014 American Red Cross survey found while 80 percent of American adults say they can swim, only 56 percent can perform basic skills needed to save their life in a water emergency situation. The five basic skills include:

  • Stepping or jumping into the water (over your head)
  • Returning to the surface and floating or treading water for one minute
  • Turning around in a full circle and finding an exit
  • Swimming 25 yards to the exit
  • Exiting the water without using a ladder

Kerner has taught swimming lessons for more than 15 years and says now more than ever, she has adults taking lessons.

“I think most get to a point in their lives where they say, ‘I have to get this figured out,’” explains Kerner. “Living in Dallas, people want to be able to go to a nearby lake or jump in a local swimming pool and be able to swim with their kids or friends.”

Lesson Plan

When it comes to swimming lessons for adults, the hardest part for many is getting comfortable in the pool.

“Most of the time when adults don’t know how to swim, it’s because they had a bad experience in the water as a child,” explains Kerner. “Together, we have to get them in

Happy woman taking swimming lessons with a teacher

the water and figure out their comfort level.”

Kerner says every beginner swimming lesson starts with a focus on breathing, as that skill can often be the hardest to tackle.

“Swimming is a cardiovascular exercise so you can’t hold your breath the entire time, but most people do,” says Kerner. “Often, they don’t even realize they’re doing it. It’s my job to help them develop a breathing pattern.”

From there, Kerner transitions to life-saving techniques such as floating, treading, bobbing, kicking and eventually, specific swimming strokes.

Kerner says most beginner swimming lessons last approximately 30 minutes and it doesn’t take long for someone to learn techniques that can potentially save their life.

“I had a 23-year-old student who wanted to learn to swim because she was going on vacation near water,” explains Kerner. “In just four sessions, I was able to teach her swimming fundamentals and ultimately, make her water secure. It was rewarding because I knew she was going to be able to enjoy her trip so much more.”

Cooper Fitness Center offers private and semi-private child and adult swimming lessons year-round. For more information, visit cooperfitnesscenter.com.

Categories: Cooper Updates

Mushroom Madness

From cremini to shiitake, visit your local grocery store and you will notice multiple types of mushrooms. Some, you may not have seen before. These often colorless fungi are low in calories, but pack a nutritional punch.

The Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services team explains how you can make mushrooms  part of your favorite meals.

Mushroom Fun Facts

  • Though typically grouped into the vegetable food group, mushrooms are actually fungi.
  • Mushroom DNA is more similar to human DNA than plant DNA. In fact, mushrooms produce their own vitamin D from sunlight exposure, just like humans. Try sun-dried mushrooms for a boost of vitamin D.
  • “Chicken of the Woods” or laetiporus sulphureus is a type of mushroom famous for its lemon chicken flavor.
  • Armillaria or “honey fungus” is one of the largest living organisms on earth. In Oregon, this mushroom covers 2.4 miles.

Nutritional Breakdown

  • One cup of raw mushrooms contains:
    • 16 calories
    • 0 g fat
    • 2 g carbohydrates
    • 1 g fiber
    • 2 g protein
  • Mushrooms are a low-sodium food with only 4 mg per serving. This makes the fungi a great addition to anyone’s diet, especially if you have high blood pressure.Mushrooms
  • Mushrooms are high in niacin, thiamine, riboflavin, pantothenic acid and folate. These B vitamins are important for nervous system functioning, red blood cell production and energy metabolism.
  • Mushrooms are an excellent source of selenium, which protects against skin damage.

Incorporating Mushrooms into Your Meals

  • Switch up your hamburgers by grilling a whole portobello mushroom in place of a traditional beef burger.
  • Use mushrooms to make lasagna, hamburgers, tacos or any other recipe that calls for ground beef. Combine one cup of diced cremini mushrooms with 1/2 pound of 98 percent lean ground meat in recipes that call for one pound of meat.
  • Add cremini or button mushrooms to omelettes along with onions, peppers and tomatoes for a colorful and filling breakfast.
  • Chop up oyster mushrooms and add to your favorite salad.
  • Enhance your risotto or pasta recipes with a variety of mushrooms such as cremini, portobello, button or shiitake.
  • Try sun-dried mushrooms in pasta primavera.

To save time on your next meal, pick up pre-washed and pre-sliced mushrooms. Mushrooms are best stored in a brown paper bag or cloth bag in the refrigerator to help preserve the flavor.

For more recipes, visit our health tips page.

Blog provided by Stephanie Altemus, Texas A&M University Dietetic Intern, and Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Cooper Updates