Treat Your Feet to a Watermelon Basil Pedicure at Cooper Spa

A relaxing and rejuvenating pedicure is waiting for you at Cooper Spa Dallas. Sandal season is still in full swing, which makes it the perfect time to treat your feet to our seasonal Watermelon Basil Pedicure. This Cooper Spa Dallas Seasonal Special is an ideal way to beat the heat and indulge in our summer time service.

The Watermelon Basil Pedicure begins by soaking the feet in a soothing powder bath. A watermelon basil scrub is then applied to the feet and legs; a wonderful savory fragrance fills the room. Marcia, my nail technician, does an amazing job gently rubbing the feet and legs to massage and exfoliate with the scrub. As the scrub is lightly rinsed and the aroma of watermelon and basil still lingers, the cuticles are treated, then the final step includes nails are buffed and coated with oil.

Once the cuticle and nail work is complete, the honey heel glaze is applied to the feet and ankles. It smells so good you might be tempted to sneak a taste! While the honey heel glaze moisturizes the feet are gently wrapped in hot towels and left to further absorb the conditioning serum for an additional five minutes. After the glaze is rinsed, a Whoopie Shea Butter cream is used to massage the tip of the toes to below the knees. Applying the Whoopie Shea Butter cream leaves the legs and feet deeply moisturized and smelling delightful for hours. This foot massage leaves you feeling tranquil and recharged. Marcia completes the treatment by perfectly applying your choice of a bright and summery polish.

If the seasonal Watermelon Basil Pedicure sounds like the perfect summer treatment, make your way to Cooper Spa Dallas for 60 minutes of pampering bliss. This treatment is available now through August 31. Come in, call us at 972.392.7729 or book an appointment online. Visit Cooper Spa Dallas for select services in August and receive a complimentary upgrade. Throughout the month of August, Summer Complements offers clients:

  • A free brow wax with the purchase of a Beautiful Fit or Skinceutical facial
  • A free restorative cuticle oil treatment for the hands with the purchase of any 60-minute pedicure
  • A free hydrating hair treatment with the purchase of any body scrub or wrap

Enroll in Spa Rewards and start earning perks today – rewards can be used towards spa services, exclusive offers and more! Learn more at cooperspa.com/Rewards.

Junk Food…Yea or Nay?

July 21, 2016 1 comment

It’s 100 degrees outside, you are at the grocery store and you can’t resist the ice cream on a stick covered with a thick coating of chocolate…so in the basket it goes! Of course, there are many other tasty temptations such as nacho cheese chips, double-stuffed cookies and donuts in the bakery you can’t help but include, too.

These foods all fall into the “junk food” category. Use of the term “junk food” implies that a particular food has little nutritional value and contains excessive fat, sugar, salt and calories. Junk food can include candy, chips, cookies, ice cream, soda, donuts, most sweet desserts and French fries. Too much junk food in your diet can be associated with an increase in obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and other diseases.

Some tips to consider the next time you crave your favorite junk food indulgence:

  • Moderation is the key. Don’t make junk food its own food group within your diet.
  • American Heart Association recommends women enjoy sugar in moderation by budgeting 100 calories per day; men 150 calories per day.
  • Read labels to determine portion size. Typically, a serving of ice cream is ½ cup, not 1 cup or more, which could double or triple the calories. Not knowing portion size could turn 160 calories into almost 500 very quickly!
  • Plate your serving or put in a bowl instead of eating out of a bag. This is mindful eating.
  • Ask yourself…are you eating this food because you are hungry, or is it because you are bored, angry or filling an emotional need? If it is one of the latter reasons, choose another activity such as taking a walk or calling a friend.
  • If the first bite isn’t good the second bite won’t be any better. Don’t waste your calories on something you don’t love.

For more healthy eating tips and tricks, check out Nutrition Bites on our website. To learn more about services offered by Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services, visit cooperclinicnutrition.com or call 972.560.2655.

Blog post provided by Patty Kirk, RD, RDN, LD, Cooper Clinic Registered Dietitian Nutritionist.

Prevention and Safety While Traveling Abroad

The 2016 Summer Olympics in Brazil are quickly approaching, and people from all over the world will gather to celebrate their national pride and cheer athletes on to victory. Traveling to a foreign country for a large, global event such as the Olympics requires much preparation in order to stay safe and healthy through the duration of the trip. Michele Kettles, MD, MSPH, Chief Medical Officer of Cooper Clinic, offers tips for travelers embarking on journeys abroad.

Pre-Trip Preparation

Once you finalize plans to travel abroad, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website and select the country to which you will be traveling. The website provides information about required vaccinations needed before traveling to the country along with other travel warnings and tips. Dr. Kettles recommends visiting a Passport Health travel clinic to receive vaccinations and medications specific for the country you are visiting and the activities planned during your trip.

When it comes time to pack for your trip, consider the following:

  • Bring along any over-the-counter medications you may need, such as Afrin® or Sudafed®. These can be difficult to obtain in a foreign country.
  • If you’re worried about diarrheal or respiratory issues while traveling, ask your doctor about prescribing an antibiotic. Dr. Kettles recommends a Z-Pak; another antibiotic that is common for travelers, Cipro, is being phased out by many doctors because it can cause harmful side effects.
  • If you’ll be using your cell phone while traveling abroad, talk to your wireless service provider about access you may have in the country you’re traveling to, or if you need to set up an international service plan for your time abroad.
  • Download Google Translate on your phone or portable device if you don’t speak the language of the country you’re traveling to. You’ll want to know how to communicate upon arrival and should an emergency occur during your trip.
  • Make a copy of your passport, and pack it separately from the original. If you become stranded without identification in a foreign country, odds are your stress level will increase dramatically and your vacation may be cut short.
  • Provide a family member or friend with your travel itinerary and contact information for the duration of your trip.

A Safe Trip is a Fun Trip

A safe trip abroad begins while you’re en route to your destination–oftentimes, this can be a long flight. Blood clots, also known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are a primary concern for travelers who must sit on planes for hours at a time. Make sure to stand up and walk around when it is safe to do so, drink plenty of water to stay hydrated and don’t take medication that will leave you asleep for hours on end. Immobilization from sleeping for the duration of a long flight leaves you at a higher risk for blood clots.

Upon arrival, be smart about what you eat and drink. In many countries, tap water and ice may not be safe to drink for visitors. Eating certain foods can be risky as well. If possible, try to eat foods you can wash, peel and cook. Steer clear of foods at buffets and salad bars, as you won’t know how well uncooked food was washed and if it has contaminated other foods around it.

Additionally, go the extra mile to prevent illness and injury. For example, if you’re visiting an area where malaria or the Zika virus is present, taking medication before the trip may not be enough. Wear mosquito-repellent clothing and use sprays and nets to protect yourself, and prevent the risk altogether by avoiding going outside at dusk and dawn, when mosquitos are most active.

Be Aware of Your Surroundings

According to Dr. Kettles, motor vehicle accidents are the number one cause of injury and death to Americans while traveling abroad. Be cautious of how you plan to get around while traveling, because options can vary greatly depending on where you are traveling. Don’t hop on the first form of public transportation you come across–be choosy about motor vehicles you ride in, and make sure to wear a seat belt.

In situations such as the Olympics, Super Bowl or World Cup, it’s important to be diligent about your personal safety. People travel from around the world to attend these events, and criminals do the same. Be aware of your surroundings at all times:

  • Don’t go out at night in strange or unsafe areas
  • Avoid flaunting glamorous clothes or accessories in public
  • Be prepared and knowledgeable about where you are going–try not to look like an obvious target if you are lost or unsure about something

Be Prepared for the Worst

It never hurts to be overly prepared and cautious when it comes to your health and safety, especially when traveling away from home. Bringing your medical records with you to a foreign country is a good idea, especially if you have a significant medical condition. At the very least, make sure to carry a complete list of medications and brief medical history summary. If possible, make use of the technology you have on-hand. If you’re a patient at Cooper Clinic with access to the Internet, you can access your medical records at any time and on any device via the new patient portal.

If you suffer an injury or illness and end up in a hospital in a foreign country, it’s important to be aware of your treatments. Depending on where you are, the blood supply at the hospital may not be as well policed as it is in the United States. Screening blood for HIV, hepatitis and other infections varies country to country. If you can avoid blood transfusions and any use of needles, it is best to do so.

Being up-to-date on all common vaccinations in the United States can help reduce your risk of infection in another country, but being prepared for specific risks is key to having an enjoyable and safe trip abroad. For more information about Cooper Clinic, visit cooper-clinic.com or call 972.560.2667.

Red, White and Blue Healthy Treats to Beat the Heat

Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services is all about celebrating Independence Day with a healthy twist. These recipes provide a sweet treat without added calories, and can help you cool off from the summer sun.

BLUEBERRY PROTEIN SMOOTHIE

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz. 1% milk
  • 1 scoop Designer Whey Protein  (French Vanilla Flavor)
  • 1 cup unsweetened frozen blueberries.

Instructions:

  1. Pour milk into blender.
  2. Add Whey protein powder. Blend until mixed well.
  3. Add 1 cup frozen blueberries and blend until thoroughly mixed.

(This makes a great post-workout smoothie as it has a nice carbohydrate-to-protein ratio!)

Makes one smoothie serving.

Nutrition Information:

  • Calories: 282
  • Fat: 5g
  • Saturated fat: 3g
  • Cholesterol: 72 mg
  • Sodium: 189 mg
  • Carbohydrates: 37g
  • Fiber: 7g
  • Sugar: 27g
  • Protein: 27g

PATRIOTIC POPS: GREEK YOGURT FROZEN FRUIT POPS

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups vanilla Greek yogurt (divided use)
  • 1 cup unsweetened frozen strawberries
  • 1 cup unsweetened frozen blueberries

Instructions:

  1. Blend 1 cup of vanilla Greek yogurt in blender with 1 cup of frozen strawberries until blended well and is uniform in consistency and color throughout.
  2. Divide this evenly and pour into 6 Popsicle molds, to form a red layer.
  3. Next, pour 1 cup vanilla Greek yogurt into the 6 Popsicle molds to make a second “white layer.”
  4. Finally, blend the remaining 1 cup vanilla Greek yogurt with 1 cup frozen blueberries, until blended well and is uniform in consistency and color.
  5. Divide this evenly and pour into 6 Popsicle molds, to form a blue layer.
  6. Insert wooden Popsicle sticks and freeze Popsicles overnight or for about six hours.

Tips: Rinse blender between usages so the red and blue colors from the berries are more defined. The white layer will be a thinner layer compared to the red and blue layers.

Makes 6 Popsicles.

Nutrition information:

  • Calories: 113
  • Fat: 0g
  • Saturated fat: 0g
  • Cholesterol: 72 mg
  • Sodium: 46 mg
  • Carbohydrates: 18g
  • Fiber: 2g
  • Sugar: 13g
  • Protein: 10g

Recipes provided by Cynthanne Duryea, RDN, LD, Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services.

Conquering the Summer Camp Swim Test

Sneakers? Sunscreen? Sleeping bag? All may be necessary items for summer camp, but children should also be armed with top-notch swim skills. Cooper Fitness Center Swim Pro Marni Kerner helps kids of all ages prepare for swim tests that are often required at summer day camps and overnight camps.

Each test varies in length and intensity. Some require a child to swim the length or width of a pool, but others require performing all four competitive strokes–freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke and butterfly–in open water situations. If a child is unable to pass the designated swim test, he or she may have limited access to water activities throughout the duration of the camp, or may be required to wear a life jacket when swimming in a pool or open water.

Training with a certified swim instructor prior to taking a swim test has numerous benefits:

  • Sharpens the child’s skills early in the summer, since it has likely been a while since the child has swam longer distances
  • Introduces specific stroke training to those who may not be familiar with all four competitive strokes
  • Increases physical strength and endurance
  • Improves stroke techniques
  • Builds confidence in the swimmer

In addition to working on swim skills, each swimmer also learns water safety and rest strokes, including how to bob and tread water in order to conserve energy.

Children may only need one lesson to refresh their swim skills, but others may take up to five or six lessons to prepare for their specific test. The time and effort invested is worth it so the kids can enjoy an exciting and safe summer in the water.

For more information about Cooper Fitness Center swim programs, visit cooperswimacademy.com or call Swim Pro Marni Kerner at 972.233.4832, ext. 5447.

10 Reasons Why Female Focus Benefits Women’s Health

Female Focus 10 years

Since 2006, hundreds of women each year have participated in more than 3,000 Female Focus classes, a science-based small group training program designed to help women exercise to gain strength as they manage diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, fibromyalgia, heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

The women who have participated in Female Focus throughout the past 10 years listed the top 10 reasons why the program has benefitted both their physical and mental health:

  1. A sense of accountability to health and fitness and provides motivation to work harder both in and outside of class
  2. Camaraderie and support of women going through similar challenges and life experiences
  3. Personal attention from Colette Cole, the director of the program, and other trainers – staff expertise and experience is unmatched
  4. Improved overall strength, posture, balance, mobility, endurance, functional movement and daily activity movement
  5. Weight loss and maintenance
  6. Enjoyment from a variety of fun workouts
  7. Reduction of injury risk and attention to detail regarding training for specific injuries
  8. Sessions are personalized for both exercise and nutrition
  9. Focus on specific women’s health issues, including improvement of bone density
  10. Stress reduction

The program is based on materials and research from Women’s Health and Fitness Guide written by Michele Kettles, MD, MSPH, Chief Medical Officer of Cooper Clinic, and Colette Cole, MS, Cooper Fitness Center Female Focus Director and Professional Fitness Trainer. Under Colette’s guidance, participants learn how to overcome physical and mental challenges that are often a side effect of health issues.

In addition to learning and growing stronger physically, many of the women are drawn to the program because of the bonds they form with each other. Many are going through similar life changes, such as kids going off to college or becoming caretakers of aging parents. They also face similar challenges and are working toward similar goals – to be healthier and happier.

Dr. Jill Ombrello has participated in Female Focus for the past three years. She joined the program because she wanted the accountability of a scheduled and customized workout. However, she had no idea how many additional benefits she would receive as a result.

“Not only did I gain accountability, but I also joined a community of women looking to improve their health in the same ways as me. We are not equally strong or flexible, but Collette creates a different, unique and interesting workout for us every time we attend. In a society where many women are often competing with one another, Colette has created a unique environment where we all feel supported and pushed to achieve greatness.”

For more information about the Female Focus program, visit cooperfitfemale.com.

Breaking Down Your Breakfast: Donuts vs. Eggs

By Cynthanne Duryea, RDN, LD, Cooper Clinic Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

donut vs egg

Today is National Egg Day and National Donut Day – what a coincidence to have two common breakfast foods be celebrated on the same day! Let’s take a look at their nutritional values and how each might be included into a healthy eating plan.

Donut Do’s and Don’ts

“How can a donut be part of a healthy eating plan?” Here at Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services, we like to have an “all foods fit” mindset. Would any registered dietitian nutritionist design healthy breakfast ideas and purposefully choose a donut as an optimal fuel option to begin a busy day? Definitely not. However, let’s look at two common donuts objectively and simply:

Donut Type

Calories Saturated Fat Carbohydrates and sugar

Time in walking (15 minute per mile pace) to burn off donut calories

Glazed Donut

260

6 31 (12 g sugar)

58 minutes

Old Fashioned Cake Donut 320 10 33 (9 g sugar)

71 minutes

Data from dunkindonuts.com

One might think the glazed donut would be higher in calories due to the sugary glazing on top. But, because the cake donut is much denser, it actually has the higher calorie content. Both donuts have significant saturated fat content. American Heart Association recommends less than six percent of daily calorie need comes from saturated fat. Based on an average 2000 calorie per day need, that would be a saturated fat recommendation of less than 13 grams per day. If you enjoy one cake donut, you have gone through 75 percent of the suggested saturated fat limit for the day.

Each donut has similar carbohydrate content, which is approximately the same amount that would be in two sandwich slices of bread. Because of the glazing, the glazed donut has a bit more sugar than the cake donut.

If you don’t really love donuts, you may decide the calorie price tag is too high for you to enjoy or justify, especially when you consider the time required to burn off the calorie content. Most donut stores will sell donut holes per piece… a great practice for damage control. Each glazed donut hole has 50-70 calories, so enjoying three would be a calorie savings compared to one whole. Remember to enjoy them as an occasional food, knowing that the nutritional value is fairly void.

Egg-cellent Healthy Options

The nutritional value of eggs is top notch. In each large egg, there are six grams of quality protein (all nine essential amino acids are found in whole eggs) which can sustain energy levels throughout the day. Breakfast for many is carbohydrate-rich and protein poor, including cereal, toast, large muffins or jumbo bagels. The egg is a perfect addition to breakfast because its protein is packed into just 70 calories. Eggs are a terrific source of many nutrients, including vitamins D and B12.

For at least 40 years, eggs have gotten a bad rap due to the cholesterol content of their yolks. But after many years of research, it has been concluded that the cholesterol in egg yolks is not a culprit in increasing heart disease risk or raising levels of bad cholesterol. In fact, the new 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans has excluded the recommendation to limit dietary cholesterol.

However, each yolk contains two grams of saturated fat, so a three-egg omelet contains six grams of saturated fat.  An egg-straordinary idea is to combine two egg whites per one whole egg to decrease saturated fat, as the white has no fat content.

To add an egg to a meal or a quick snack, try boiling it. The shell is nature’s packaging, making it portable and convenient to carry to work or on the road.  As easy as boiled eggs are to prepare, peeling the egg can be challenging. To make the perfect boiled egg that is easy to peel, we offer these tips from www.incredibleegg.org:

  1. PLACE eggs in saucepan large enough to hold them in single layer. ADD cold water to cover eggs by one inch. HEAT over high heat just to boiling. REMOVE from burner. COVER pan.
  2. LET EGGS STAND in hot water about 12 minutes for large eggs (nine minutes for medium eggs; 15 minutes for extra large).
  3. DRAIN immediately and serve warm. OR, cool completely under cold running water or in bowl of ice water, then REFRIGERATE.

For easier peeling, use eggs that are 7 to 10 days old.

For more food and nutrition tips from Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services, visit our Nutrition Bites page. To learn more about Cooper Clinic Nutrition Services, visit cooperclinicnutrition.com or call 972.560.2667.

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